A man collects plastic bottles to sell for recycling, in a landfill of Managua, Nicaragua, on January 11, 2013. Photo: Getty Images
Scientists buried biodegradeable plastics for three years, found it doesn't degrade
By Ian Steadman - 31 March 15:43

Common method of making plastic "biodegradeable" seems to be useless, in some types.

Fish swimming through the coral on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Photo: Getty Images
Coral reefs are an irreplaceable environmental and economic treasure, in need of help
By Tosin Thompson - 26 March 16:23

"Losing the world's coral reefs would be like burning every Impressionist painting - you won't get them back." A new exhibiton at the Natural History Museum shows just what a tragedy these natural wonders' loss would be.

Jeremy Clarkson. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images
The neuroscience of Jeremy Clarkson
By Michael Brooks - 26 March 15:33

If humans can’t control themselves, they cannot be allowed the freedoms others enjoy: humans learn self-control, she says, in the same way that toddlers learn to control their bladders.

Zombies, off-duty. Photo: Getty Images
Good news: if you survive the first week of the zombie outbreak, chances are you'll survive it all
By Ian Steadman - 25 March 13:55

Great news for fans of not being eaten alive, less good news for the clumsy and slow.

How far can you trust citizen journalism on the internet?
By Vicky Baker - 25 March 10:55

As the BBC reports that it can receive up to 10,000 pieces of user-generated content on a single day, Vicky Baker looks at the increasing need for verification and how propaganda and hoaxes have become more prevalent.

Mind games: a research volunteer is prepared for scanning
Mapping the psychedelic brain: how LSD is making a comeback
By Ian Steadman - 25 March 9:14

Can drugs help depression? Crowdfunding allows science researchers to bypass institutional reservations and study taboo subjects.

So far, it's only if you've got one of these by your username.
Twitter gives (a few) users a new filter to block abuse
By Ian Steadman - 24 March 15:40

The social network's giving its "elite" users more control over whose tweets they have to pay attention to.

Phobos in 2008, as seen by the  Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Mars' unusual moons may have been created by collision with Pluto-sized object
By Ian Steadman - 23 March 15:24

Mars' moons are unusual in the Solar System - for their size, shape and colour from their parent planet. Where did they come from? We've got some clues to work with.

A patient in bed touches their stomach. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Researchers have a gut feeling - could chronic pain be caused by bacteria?
By Michael Brooks - 19 March 12:07

This month, researchers are gathering in Cambridge to try and work out why we hurt. Michael Brooks weighs up one suggestion.

Beer being served in a pub. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Graham didn’t know what had hit him – he was fine when he left the pub
By Phil Whitaker - 19 March 11:50

In this week's Health Matters, a man finds he has been hurt on the way home - and Phil Whitaker suggests sometimes the best thing to do is move on.

A cutaway view of Saturn's moon Enceladus, showing possible hydrothermal activity that may be taking place on and under the seafloor of its subsurface ocean. Image: NASA/JPL
The unexpectedly watery moons of our Solar System may be friendlier to life than we thought
By Tosin Thompson - 19 March 11:47

Secret oceans on the moons Enceladus and Ganymede were discovered within days of each other, reshaping our belief that the Earth is the Solar System's most watery, life-friendly habitat.

A man at a Berlin computer hacker's congress. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Click and collect: How to become a 21st-century cyber superpower
By Francis Maude - 16 March 15:32

Companies must manage their own risks. Digital security can’t be an issue for the IT department alone: it’s an issue for the boardroom, too, writes Paymaster General Francis Maude.

Wind turbines in Boulogne-sur-mer, France. Photo: Getty Images
The UK is one of the worst nations in the EU for renewable energy
By Tosin Thompson - 12 March 17:25

The latest figures on the progress EU nations are making towards reducing their use of non-renewable energy show the UK scraping in near the bottom of the class.

Black hole Cygnus X-1. Photo: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss
Dead stars and deep secrets: we are still in the dark when it comes to black holes
By Michael Brooks - 11 March 17:20

Despite Einstein and Hawking, we still know very little about black holes.

Digital hieroglyphics: what does the buffer symbol tell us about ourselves?
By Thomas McMullan - 06 March 9:42

Staring at a buffer symbol, waiting for something on the internet to load can be both reassuring and distressing. We wait with the belief that something is happening out of sight.

Smoking. Photo: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images
Doom-laden ads put healthy people in a panic – but some need to worry a bit more
By Phil Whitaker - 05 March 10:02

It's hard to draw the line between inciting fear, and giving a fair warning - as Colin and Mary's story proves.

Scientists undertake Gamma Knife surgery, one treatment for ocular melanoma. Photo: Bertrand Langlois/AFP/Getty Images
Spare a thought for “orphan” drugs: the rare disease medicines that prove health is a numbers game
By Michael Brooks - 05 March 9:09

Oliver Sacks wrote of his imminent death with remarkable dignity, knowing science cannot help him. But what about the cases where it might?

The infamous dress. Photo: swiked/Tumblr
The dress of many colours: is it blue and black or white and gold?
By Tosin Thompson - 27 February 12:30

A recent debate on the colour of a dress has broken the internet. But is it all just a visual illusion? 

Why not? Robots dancing in Madrid's robot museum. Photo: Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images
Nuclear armaments? Global warming? All hail our robot overlords!
By Michael Brooks - 26 February 11:09

I, for one, accept our new robot politicians.

The relentless cheerleading of the internet dulls our wits.
The happiness conspiracy: against optimism and the cult of positive thinking
By Bryan Appleyard - 26 February 10:20

Pessimism gets a bad press, but compulsory positive thinking can be brutally enforced.

Less than fortnight from Ceres, the two strange bright spots on its surface are now clearly visible in the latest image from Dawn. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA
Bright lights and the possibility of life add mystery to Nasa's Ceres mission
By Tosin Thompson - 25 February 16:01

With only days to go before the first probe goes into orbit around this surprisingly interesting dwarf planet, further mysteries - including two strange bright spots in a crater - are coming into focus.

Whispering plays a big part in ASMR. Photo: Oli Scarff/Getty Images
Welcome to the world of autonomous sensory meridian response videos, the internet’s soft play area
By Eleanor Margolis - 19 February 16:50

For some people, videos of people performing intricate tasks or crinkling paper can produce a satisfying tingling feeling. If you can suspend your cyncism, it’s one of the nicest places on the internet to be.

People, please don’t go to Mars - you’ll die
By Tosin Thompson - 19 February 14:58

The Red Planet is bad for humans in all kinds of ways, and being first there may be little consolation if you die before you even reach the surface.

Realistic-colour image of Europa. Photo: NASA / Jet Propulsion Lab-Caltech / SETI Institute
Is there life on Jupiter’s ice moon?
By Michael Brooks - 18 February 10:25

If only politics worked half as well as space exploration.

God’s houses: arboretums recall the architectural grandeur of churches. Photo: Mike Vardy/Science Photo Library
Botanical gardens are the cathedrals of our times
By John Burnside - 18 February 10:20

In the bleak midwinter, there are few walks more energising.

More pancake is better pancake. Photo: Getty Images
Using bad science to create the perfect Pancake Day recipe
By Ian Steadman - 17 February 10:41

Lots of places claim to have the “perfect” pancake recipe – but here’s how to guarantee the best results. Maybe.

Rain check: Dave King eschews technology and favours ancient sayings. Nick Ray/The Times/News Syndication
Watching with the weatherman: the self-taught meteorologist
By Xan Rice - 17 February 10:03

“Dave the Weather” may seem comical - but many take his predictions seriously.

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