Crushed by the wheels of industry: critics increasingly see new tech as one of the free market's most dangerous tools of oppression. Image: Ikon Images
The new Luddites: why former digital prophets are turning against tech
By Bryan Appleyard - 29 August 15:18

Neo-Luddism began to emerge in the postwar period. First after the emergence of nuclear weapons, and secondly when it became apparent new computer technologies had the power to change our lives completely.

Students follow a lesson in a biology laboratory at the Roma Tre university (Photo credit: Tizani/AFP/Getty Images)
Scientists criticise new “open access” journal which limits research-sharing with copyright
By Fiona Rutherford - 29 August 13:22

Restrictive copyright licenses and expensive submission fees have led to a significant number of scientists to criticise Science Advances, a new journal due to launch next year, for failing to live up to its open access principles.

Miranda July.
Miranda July’s new app Somebody delivers text messages in person
By Philip Maughan - 29 August 12:42

“Every relationship becomes a three-way,” July says of the new app, which launched yesterday at the Venice Film Festival.

A picture taken on August 17, 2013 shows the Cattenom nuclear power plant in Cattenom, northeastern France. Photo: AFP Photo/Jean-Christophe Verhaegen
Environmentalists must stop ignoring the needs of poor nations when combating global warming
By Amartya Sen - 25 August 12:23

Campaigns against pollution that causes climate change often focus on reducing energy usage, when poor countries desperately need that energy to give their citizens freer and fuller lives. A new ethical framework for evaluating environmental issues is needed.

An Orb-weaver spider (Araneus diadematus) in Rennes, western France (Photo: Damien Meyer/ AFP/Getty Images)
City living is making spiders bigger, study finds
By Fiona Rutherford - 22 August 12:49

According to new research, city-dwelling spiders are larger and more fertile than their rural-dwelling relatives.

Rapid responses and targeted messaging: Matthew McGregor. Photo: Micha Theiner/Eyevine
Labour’s most powerful weapon: its digital campaign
By Lucy Fisher - 21 August 15:45

Cooler, younger and tech savvy – meet the team led by Obama’s former digital strategist which Labour hopes will win it the election. 

Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux in “Blue is the Warmest Colour”.
Five theories as to why lesbians are more likely to orgasm than straight women
By Eleanor Margolis - 21 August 13:31

A recent study by the Kinsey Institute has found that lesbians are much more likely to orgasm during sex than either straight or bisexual women.

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is seen in a photo taken by the Rosetta spacecraft, 6 August. Photo: Getty
Hunting the rocky rubber duck: how comet-chasing Rosetta could change history
By Michael Brooks - 21 August 10:00

This ball of rock and ice formed at the same time as our solar system and should, if predictions are correct, contain complex organic molecules, the same stuff as terrestrial life is made from.

Doctor and a psychologist meet with members of a patient's family (Photo: Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)
Shy patients are more open about their health when talking to a robot AI, study finds
By Fiona Rutherford - 20 August 14:03

A recent study is the first study to demonstrate that 'virtual humans' could help patients overcome psychological barriers to honesty in medical interviews especially for sensitive, personal and highly stigmatized topics - these findings could prevent potentially serious consequences for the patient’s health, such as incorrect diagnosis.

An Apple iPad with Twitter's native app. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
Twitter's taking away your control over what tweets you choose to see
By Ian Steadman - 20 August 12:38

A subtle change in how Twitter's feed works will make some people very angry, but most people probably won't even notice.

DNA strands on display in a double helix model on display at the Science Museum. Photo: Getty
DIY diagnosis: how an extreme athlete uncovered her genetic flaw
By Ed Yong - 19 August 12:13

When Kim Goodsell discovered that she had two extremely rare genetic diseases, she taught herself genetics to help find out why. Ed Yong tells her story.

Some slices are bigger than others. Photo: jzawdubya/Flickr/CC BY-SA
Geotagging reveals Wikipedia is not quite so equal after all
By Mark Graham - 18 August 17:28

It may be open to the world, but the articles on Wikipedia reflect existing hierarchies of knowledge.

Part of the struggle for these men is reconciling their masculine identity with abstinence. Photo: Getty
What happens when evangelical virgin men get married? A secular female sociologist found out
By Alice Robb - 18 August 15:56

Alice Robb talks to sociologist Sarah Diefendorf about what it’s like to be a secular woman at a virginity support group for religious men. 

Two heads aren’t better than one: even the most sophisticated antidepressants seem unequal to the challenge of curing our modern malaise
Shrinking horizons: can science offer new answers to mental illness?
By Lisa Appignanesi - 14 August 15:00

It is clear that the NHS and the rise of scientific medicine in the west count among the greatest achievements of the postwar years. But can doctors really be the providers of all our goods?

The bacteria found in our mouths could reveal early signs of illness, study finds
By Fiona Rutherford - 14 August 13:57

Microbiologists have focused on comparing different types of bacteria in healthy and diseased individuals - however, new findings about bacteria behaviour in our mouths could lead to improved ways of preventing or even reversing gum disease.

The morning after: festivals are prone to outbreaks of mumps and measles. Photo: Olivia Harris/Reuters
How to stay healthy at summer festivals
By Michael Brooks - 14 August 10:00

Following outbreaks of campylobacter infection at Glastonbury and flu at festivals in Europe, some researchers are calling for better surveillance of the threats to festival-goers’ health.

Maryam Mirzakhani, the first ever woman to win the Fields Medal. Photograph: Stanford University
Maryam Mirzakhani becomes first woman to win Fields Medal, the “Nobel” of maths
By Fiona Rutherford - 13 August 13:24

An Iranian professor in mathematics at Stanford University becomes the first woman mathematician to win the Fields Medal, in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of geometry.

Tian Tian the female panda at Edinburgh Zoo, photographed in her enclosure on April 2014. Photo: Getty
Panda Sutra: the ups and downs of getting grumpy bears to have sex
By Forbes Howie - 12 August 14:45

Breeding pandas in captivity is notoriously difficult. A scientist who worked on getting Tian Tian, a panda at Edinburgh Zoo, pregnant explains how you go about it.

Sportsman flips over the bullpen wall while trying to catch a foul ball. Photo By Jamie Squire/Getty Image
Study finds brain confusion causes us to laugh at the misfortune of others
By Fiona Rutherford - 12 August 13:30

When it comes to laughing at someone spilling a tray of drinks or falling down a well, research suggests a person's facial expression determines whether we find it funny or not.

Are we being naive about our data? Photo: Getty
Should we be getting a share of the money our personal data earns?
By Emma Woollacott - 08 August 13:08

Facebook collects and sells our data – and yet we seem to care comparatively little that we don’t get a cut.

A vendor displays on a stall freshly caught local mullet fish on August 1, 2014 at the main fish market in Kuwait City. Photo: YASSER AL-ZAYYAT/AFP/Getty Images
Ocean and fish mercury levels have soared as a result of human activity, study finds
By Fiona Rutherford - 08 August 12:08

According to scientists, some fish could contain at least three times more mercury than 150 years ago due to pollution caused by human activity – the researchers hope that these findings will increase awareness of the harmful effects of mercury pollution.

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera. Image:  ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Rosetta becomes the first spacecraft to ever go into orbit around a comet
By Fiona Rutherford - 07 August 12:28

After a ten year chase, Rosetta became the first ever spacecraft to intercept and go into orbit around a comet - and over the next 18 months will begin searching for clues left over from the earliest moments of our Solar System.

More than 70 per cent of MPs use Twitter.
To watch the political elite debate, head to Twitter, not Westminster
By Lucy Fisher - 06 August 15:55

Twitter, once the preserve of teens and techies, is now the medium of choice for the political establishment too. 

Your cool new phone is damaging the planet: it's time for some anti-design
By Bran Knowles - 06 August 15:33

The only genuinely sustainable approach to tech products is to design them in ways that decrease people's reliance on technology.

A child playing the trumpet at a public event. Photo: Getty Images
When it comes to expertise, 10,000 hours of practice isn’t enough
By Fiona Rutherford - 06 August 11:53

Contrary to popular opinion, practicing a musical instrument or a sport for thousands of hours isn’t enough to produce a Mozart or a Maradona – though it still helps.

A smartphone running Facebook. Photo: Johan Larsson / Flickr / CC BY 2.0
Sex workers on Facebook are not a sexualised peep show available at all hours
By Margaret Corvid - 05 August 9:25

The default assumption when it comes to sex workers on Facebook is that their lives are an open book.

Water horses: a mother and baby hippo swim at a zoo in Mexico City. Photo: Getty
Michael Brooks: Hippo fossils offer clues about swimming
By Michael Brooks - 30 July 15:00

Fossilised guides to what the earth was like millions of years ago are rare, and understanding water tracks can make a difference.

A nurse with bottles of medicine. Photo: Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images
David Tredinnick's right that alternative medicine could work - but that's not reason to embrace it
By George Gillett - 29 July 16:08

Our understanding of placebo-based treatments suggests that alternative medicine could benefit patients. But the impact on medical ethics could lead to unintended consequences.

Uber is now integrated into Google Maps and the New York Subway
By Jonn Elledge - 28 July 13:17

It's easier than ever to experience surge pricing.

Charles Bell: Anatomy of the Brain c.1802. Photo: Shaheen Lakhan / Flickr
We don't really understand empathy, but we know business could do with a little more
By Ajit Niranjan - 28 July 9:50

Our understanding of empathy is pretty limited, but many figures are calling for change. Corporate culture is beginning to recognise the need to put yourself in someone else's shoes.

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