The teenage hormone that triggers puberty and prevents cancer

The appropriately named kisspeptin was discovered by accident, and has some surprising effects.

Whatever your parents told you, it’s not about the birds and the bees. Ultimately, reproduction seems to be about a protein molecule called kisspeptin. The name has nothing to do with foreplay, however. Kisspeptin was discovered in Hershey, Pennsylvania, and its name comes from the town’s other great research success: Hershey’s Kisses chocolates.

At some point, most people’s brain starts to secrete kisspeptin; when it does, the hypothalamus begins to produce a chemical called gonadotropin-releasing hormone, or GnRH. Written down, it looks like a teenage grunt and that’s what it leads to. GnRH release is a crucial moment at the beginning of puberty. It brings about the secretion of hormones that start egg or sperm production and create the characteristic signs of sexual maturity.

On 12 September, the King’s College London professor Kevin O’Byrne discussed the “enigma” of GnRH at a conference at the University of Bristol. The central enigma is the unanswered question of what kicks off puberty – we still don’t know what activates kisspeptin to release GnRH.

It seems to have something to do with the brain’s monitoring of stress and nutrition. Without good fat reserves and a relaxed demeanour, the chemical sages won’t let you enter the trials of reproduction. That’s why girls suffering from anorexia can experience disrupted menstruation.

Kisspeptin’s role in puberty was discovered by accident when researchers were looking at its anti-cancer properties. Controlling the teenage brain is not the only thing it can do. GnRH is now used as a part of some cancer treatment routines because it stops the production of oestrogen, a hormone that seems to play a role in stimulating tumour growth.

Here’s another clue: some of the ugliest rodents on the planet, known as “naked mole rats”, are awash with kisspeptin – and they don’t get cancer.

Most animals have levels of kisspeptin neurons that vary according to sex as well as reproductive state. New research shows that naked mole rats have high kisspeptin and GnRH levels no matter what their readiness for reproduction.

That is particularly odd because, despite these high levels of kisspeptin, most naked mole rats don’t develop the ability to breed. Like some species of bee, naked mole rats live in colonies in which only a queen and a few consorts develop the ability to reproduce. The rest are workers that remain sterile all their lives. And those are long lives.

Their extraordinary resistance to developing cancers makes naked mole rats the longestliving rodents. Mice and rats typically live for two or three years; naked mole rats often live for two decades or more. Understanding what kisspeptin does for the naked mole rat could assist our fight against the ravages of ageing.

However, our slowly increasing grasp of kisspeptin and GnRH is causing a dilemma. The age at which human beings hit puberty is falling – on average, it has fallen by five years since 1920. It’s less of a problem for boys than for girls, for whom “precocious puberty” is linked with an increased risk of breast cancer, mental disorders and, in later life, polycystic ovary syndrome.

That raises the question of whether we should intervene. There’s still a lot we don’t know but research has shown that an injection of kisspeptin kicks off puberty artificially. More usefully, drugs that block kisspeptin prevent puberty from starting and doctors are starting to intervene in the most extreme cases of precocious puberty. Some see this as a risky thing to do when we have no long-term data on the outcome.

This new branch of science might not yet have hit puberty but it is already starting to give us trouble.

Teenage kicks: Kisspeptin not only triggers puberty but also helps fight cancer

Michael Brooks holds a PhD in quantum physics. He writes a weekly science column for the New Statesman, and his most recent book is At the Edge of Uncertainty: 11 Discoveries Taking Science by Surprise.

This article first appeared in the 23 September 2013 issue of the New Statesman, Can Miliband speak for England?

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The second coming of Gordon Ramsay

A star is reborn. 

It would be a lie to say that Gordon Ramsay ever disappeared. The celebrity chef made his television debut in 1997 and went on to star in shows in 1998, 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017. There hasn’t been a lull in Ramsay’s career, which has arguably gone from strength to strength. In 2000, he was cooking for Vladimir Putin and Tony Blair – in 2008, he ate the raw heart of a dead puffin.

Left: Gordon Ramsay shaking hands with Vladimir Putin. Right: Gordon Ramsay hugging a puffin (different from the one he ate).

Yet we are, undeniably, in the middle of a Ramsay renaissance. How? How could a man that conquered the last twenty years of cookery-based television have an upsurge in popularity? There are only so many television channels – so many amateur donkey chefs. Wrong. The internet has enabled a Ramsay resurgence, the second act of a play overflowing with blood, sweat, and French onion soup.

Wow.

We all, of course, know about Gordon’s Twitter account. Although started in 2010, the social media profile hit the headlines in February this year when Ramsay began rating food cooked by the world’s amateur-amateur chefs. But other elements of Ramsay’s internet celebrity are more miraculous and mysterious.

His official YouTube channel uploads, on average, three videos a week. Decades old clips from Kitchen Nightmares accumulate over three million views in as many days. A 15,000 follower-strong Facebook fan page for the show – which premiered in 2007 and ended in 2014 – was set up on 19 June 2017.

Wow, wow, wow, wow. Wow.       

A Google Trends graph showing an April 2017 surge in Ramsay's popularity, after a decline in 2014.                                      

What makes a meme dank? Academics don’t know. What is apparent is that a meme parodying Gordon Ramsay’s fury over missing lamb sauce (first aired on Hell’s Kitchen in 2006) had a dramatic upsurge in popularity in December 2016. This is far from Gordon’s only meme. Image macros featuring the star are captioned with fictitious tirades from the chef, for example: “This fish is so raw… it’s still trying to find Nemo”. A parody clip from The Late Late Show with James Cordon in which Ramsay calls a woman an “idiot sandwich” has been watched nearly five million times on YouTube.

And it is on YouTube where Ramsay memes most thrive. The commenters happily parrot the chef’s most memable moments, from “IT’S RAW” to the more forlorn “fuck me” after the news something is frozen. “HELLO MY NAME IS NINOOOOO!” is an astonishingly popular comment, copied from a clip in which a Kitchen Nightmares participant mocks his brother. If you have not seen it – you should.

But what does all this mean for Ramsay’s career? His YouTube channel and Facebook page are clearly meticulously managed by his team – who respond to popular memes by clipping and cutting new videos of classic Ramsay shows. Although this undoubtedly earns a fortune in ad revenue, Ramsay’s brand has capitalised on his internet fame in more concrete ways. The chef recently voiced Gordon Ramsay Dash, a mobile game by Glu Games Inc in which you can cook with the star and he will berate or praise you for your efforts. Ten bars of gold – which are required to get upgrades and advance in the game – cost 99p.

Can other celebrity chefs learn from Ramsay? A generation will never forgive that twisted, golden piece of meat, Jamie Oliver, for robbing them of their lunch time Turkey Twizzlers. But beyond this, the internet’s love is impossible to game. Any celebrity who tried to generate an online following similar to Ramsay’s would instantly fail. Ramsay’s second coming is so prolific and powerful because it is completely organic. In many ways, the chef is not resposible for it. 

In truth, the Ramsay renaissance only worked because it was - though the chef himself would not want to admit it - completely raw.

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.