Does the 485th richest person in Britain really need to crowdfund a mobile phone?

People get fanatical about open-source software, but Canonical Inc. is not a charity, writes Alex Hern.

Yesterday, Canonical, the private company which leads development of the open-source operating system Ubuntu, started a crowdfunding campaign on the site IndieGoGo. The aim is to raise $32m to enable the production of the "Ubuntu Edge", a planned smartphone running the operating system which will incorporate elements of the desktop software, to create what the company calls "next generation of personal computing".

The device itself looks promising, although with a starter price of $830 (the crowdfunding campaign is offering discounts of up to $230 to early backers) it will need to be top-of-the-line to compete. Nonetheless, just a day in and they have already raised over $4m. But there's a bigger question to be asked, which is: why crowdfund?

The relationship between Ubuntu and Canonical can be confusing, at least to people outside the world of open-source software development. "Open-source" is the term for software which has been released to the commons by its creators. There's a number of ways to do this, but the most popular is with a so-called "copyleft" license, like the "GNU general public license", or GPL. That allows anyone to take the source code of a program and use it to make new things, without asking permission or paying anyone anything; but, it requires that any new software which is made is also licensed under the GPL, and has its source code released to the public.

Ubuntu, the operating system which Canonical leads development of, is licensed in this way. It's based on a family of open-source operating systems called GNU/Linux, and so it would be difficult (although not impossible) to charge for: anyone who wanted to get the software for free could perfectly legally download the source code, compile it, and then host it themselves.

Instead, the way companies such as Canonical make their money is by selling customer support and similar services to users of open source software. But with the Ubuntu Edge, they won't even have to do that. While the software will be open source, the hardware is still something people will have to buy, so they will be able to make money on it far more directly. And they do make money; Canonical is a private company with a reported annual revenue of $30m, founded by Mark Shuttleworth, the 485th richest person in Britain, who bought a flight on the International Space Station in 2002 for $20m.

If you're a multi-million dollar company headed by a multimillionaire with a bolshie idea for a product which could make you a lot of money, the normal way to do things is to sell shares and take loans until you've got enough cash to fund the product; then sell that product to customers. Taking thousands of pre-orders for a phone which you won't deliver until May 2014 – and which you have no contractual obligation to deliver at all, because crowdfunding sites are not e-commerce sites – and dressing it up in the aesthetics of artistic patronage is an odd, and slightly distasteful, way of doing things.

Kickstarter, the leading crowdfunding site, recently doubled-down on its opposition to this sort of campaign, writing that it's a service "to help bring creative projects to life", and tightening up its rules to prevent companies using it to launch their businesses. It's not hard to see why, when this is the sort of thing which has been stopped.

The Ubuntu Edge docked with a monitor. Photograph: Canonical, Inc.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Twitter is rolling out (slightly) longer tweets

Plus the demise of the dot-at. 

We've heard rumblings for a while that Twitter plans to move away from its simple USP (140 characters per tweet, a list of chronological tweets on your timeline) in favour of a more curated, less restrictive model. 

Today, the site announced changes that will reduce the limits on tweet length, but not in an extreme way – rumours that the site planned to kill off the character limit entirely seem unfounded, at least for now. Instead, usernames and media attachments like links, polls or images will no longer be included in the limit, which will come as a relief to anyone with a long handle or media brands (naming no names) which often tweet links. The company says the changes will roll out over the "next several months".  

This probably doesn't mean you'll be able to have a poll, a picture and a Periscope livestream in a single tweet, but it does mean you could potentially @ in unlimited numbers of people. For anyone who has been harassed on the site, this isn't great news - at least in the past trolls' audiences were limited by tweet length.  

The site is also killing off ".@": the method used by users who want replies or direct addressals to be seen by all their followers. At the moment, any tweet starting with an "@" doesn't feed onto the main timeline, and can only be seen by selecting "tweets and replies" on a specific user's profile.

In future, Twitter will recognise which tweets are actually replies and hide them, but non-replies which start with an "@" will still display in feeds. You'll also be able to retweet yourself, or quote your own tweets, so you can make replies appear on your followers' feeds if desired. The press release also toe-curlingly suggests that you could use this function for when you "feel like a really good one went unnoticed". 

The move suggests Twitter wants users to post media-filled tweets, and doesn't want to punish those that do with decreased space for a message. The social media site recently brought live-streaming app Periscope, which will also beneift from the change.

The company explains in the press release that the original 140 character limit, based on the length of a text message, is a little out of date. Now, apparently, tweets have become a "rich canvas for creative expression". You heard them - go forth and Periscope. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.