Happy Ed Balls day, one and all

We just can't leave that infamous tweet alone.

Two years ago today, Ed Balls tweeted his own name:

It was a name search gone awry. But, crucially, the Shadow Chancellor never deleted it, so 15,000 of us have now enjoyed retweeting it, and a meme was born. Today, it is celebrated:

The man himself gave an interview to the Mirror yesterday, in which he expressed his bafflement at people's fondness for tweeting his name (with a dig at Osborne thrown in for good measure):

I think the best thing I can do is not look at Twitter and bury my head in the sand - like George Osborne on the economy.

His tweet made "news":

Google got in on the act (not really):

It even spread off Twitter into the real world:

And people have inserted it into the world of cartoons:

[If this kind of thing floats your boat, Buzzfeed has a pretty exhaustive list.]

As well as people just tweeting "Ed Balls" (and trust me, there will be lots of those today), it spawned copycat tweets:

There are even now "Ed Balls" hipsters:

And those who express their enjoyment through song:

Twitter will most likely feel like this today:

Have we reached "Peak Ed Balls"? The Guardian advises going for a walk in the sunshine instead, which might not be a bad idea...

Ed Balls, obvs. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.