People are dying of cancer because they are worried about inconveniencing their doctor

There's low-hanging fruit in medicine yet.

A British Journal of Cancer paper published last week (pdf) reveals how many low-hanging fruit there are to fighting cancer in Britain today. For all that the public focus remains on cancer treatment as a field of cutting-edge medical science, much of the most important work is done in finding and treating cancer early. And that aim is far more easily achieved if people actually help get there.

A sample of over 4,000 people over 50 from England, Northern Ireland and Wales looked at barriers to symptomatic presentation. It asked why people might be put off going to a doctor even if they had a symptom which they knew might be serious. People in the UK were the most likely of the nations surveyed to not go to the doctor through embarrassment, fear of wasting the doctor's time, and worry about what the doctor might find. Of those, the most common reason was worry about wasting the doctors time: a full 34 per cent of those surveyed put off an appointment over that fear.

Putting all the reasons together, the UK had the highest mean barriers to "symptomatic presentation" — going to the doctor.

The authors conclude:

In the UK, interventions to promote early presentation might usefully focus on addressing awareness of the age-related risk and increasing the public’s confidence to approach the GP with possible cancer symptoms.

It's easy to forget how simple some of the most important things in medicine are, but people are dying of cancer in Britain because they are worried about inconveniencing the doctor. That probably shouldn't continue to happen.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Fight: Arron Banks versus Mary Beard on the fall of Rome

On the one hand: one of Britain's most respected classicists. On the other: Nigel Farage's sugar daddy. 

Tom Lehrer once said that he would quit satire after Henry Kissinger – him of napalm strikes and the Nixon administration – received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Your mole is likewise minded to hand in hat, glasses and pen after the latest clash of the titans.

In the blue corner: Arron Banks, insurance millionaire and Nigel Farage’s sugar daddy.

In the red corner: Mary Beard, Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge, documentarian, author, historian of the ancient world.

It all started when Banks suggested that the fall of the Roman Empire was down to…you guessed it, immigration:

To which Beard responded:

Now, some might back down at this point. But not Banks, the only bank that never suffers from a loss of confidence.

Did Banks have another life as a classical scholar, perhaps? Twitter users were intrigued as to where he learnt so much about the ancient world. To which Banks revealed all:

I, Claudius is a novel. It was written in 1934, and concerns events approximately three centuries from the fall of Rome. But that wasn't the end of Banks' expertise:

Gladiator is a 2000 film. It is set 200 years before the fall of Rome.

Your mole rests. 

I'm a mole, innit.