RoboRoach + Twitter = Crowdsourced cockroach steering

#cyborgcockroacheswillruletheworld

Artist Brittany Ransom has built a tiny cockroach backpack which lets her remote control a cockroach with Twitter. For science art! CNET has a video of the insectoid cyborg:

Ransom let visitors to the Chicago Artists' Coalition's exhibition Life, in some form control the roach by tweeting the hashtags #turnroachleft and #turnroachright at its twitter account, @tweetroach. Every thirty seconds, the winning hashtag was sent as a command to the insect through the RoboRoach control circuit.

Ransom passed on her artist's statement to CNET:

At what point does its intelligence and ability take over? How much does it take before we are all desensitized to overstimulation? As we, as human beings, grow more cyborgian and interconnected through social media, this project helps us participate in discovering the answer.

While Ransom's point is compelling, the real wizardry lies in the RoboRoach gear itself. Created and sold by neuroscience hackers Backyard Brains, the kit lets anyone build cyborg cockroaches at home (some assembly required).

After some minor roach surgery, it sends small electric currents to the roaches antennae, making it think it's running into a wall. Zap the left antennae, and it'll turn right, and vice-versa.

Backyard Brains describe the experiments you can do with the kit:

You can use this experimental model to teach your students about current neurotechnology. For example, 1) How long before the cockroach adapts to the stimulation and learns to ignore it?, and 2) What is the optimal circuit design to make the electronics as simple and light as possible?

It's like a 21st century spin to the idea that cockroaches will survive nuclear war: TwitterRoach will probably learn to adapt to and ignore twitter long before we do. The ultimate survivor indeed.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Joshua M. Jones for Emojipedia
Show Hide image

The emojis proposed for release in 2016 are faintly disturbing

Birds of prey, dead flowers and vomit: Emojipedia's vision for 2016. 

Since, as we're constantly being told, emojis are now the fastest growing languge in the UK, it seems only appropriate that its vocabulary should expand to include more commonly used images or ideas as its popularity increases. 

Next year, the Unicode Consortium, which decides which new codes can be added to the emoji dictionary, will approve a new round of symbols. So far, 38 suggestions have been accepted as candidates for the final selection. Emojipedia, an online emoji resource, has taken it upon itself to mock up the new symbols based on the appearance of existing emojis (though emojis are designed slightly differently by different operating systems like Apple or Android). The full list will be decided by Unicode in mid-2016. 

As it stands, the new selection is a little... well, dark. 

First, there are the faces: a Pinocchio-nosed lying face, a dribbling face, a nauseous face, an upset-looking lady and a horrible swollen clown head: 

Then there's what I like to call the "melancholy nighttime collection", including a bat, owl, fox, blackened heart and dying rose: 

Here we have a few predators, thrown in for good measure, and a stop sign:

There are a few symbols of optimism amid the doom and gloom, including a pair of crossed fingers, clinking champagne glasses and smiling cowboy, plus a groom and prince to round out the bride and princess on current release. (You can see the full list of mock-ups here). But overall, the tone is remarkably sombre. 

Perhaps as emoji become ever more popular as a method of communication, we need to accept that they must represent the world in all its darkness and nuance. Not every experience deserves a smiley face, after all. 

All mock-ups: Emojpedia.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.