NASA signs $17m deal for ISS expansion

Commercial partnership will deliver the new module.

NASA is building an extension to the International Space Station, the agency announced this week. It has awarded a $17.8m contract to Bigelow Aerospace to build the "Bigelow Expandable Activity Module".

Bigelow is company which specialises in expandable – inflatable, basically – orbital habitats. The module on the ISS is intended to be a trial run for the viability of that technology for future exploration, and commercial, endeavours.

NASA's Deputy Administrator, Lori Garver, said:

This partnership agreement for the use of expandable habitats represents a step forward in cutting-edge technology that can allow humans to thrive in space safely and affordably, and heralds important progress in U.S. commercial space innovation.

The inflatable technology allows much bigger habitats to be shipped in the same rockets that are currently used for launching standard ISS modules. A comparison on Bigelow's website shows one of their proposed modules, a BA 330, alongside an ISS module:

Mark Thompson, writing for Sen, explained the technology behind the proposals:

At the heart of the inflatable technology is a material called Vectran, twice as strong as Kevlar and present in several layers of the 15cm thick skin of the Genesis craft. The flexible nature of the material results in further added safety for potential station inhabitants, a benefit supported by laboratory tests. It was found that micrometeoroids that would puncture the rigid skin of the International Space Station only penetrated half way through the skin of the Genesis craft.

Tangentially relevant, but I've wanted to get it on the site for weeks, this video of Commander Sunita Williams giving a tour of the ISS is the longest YouTube video I have watched all the way through, because it is astonishing. Imagine how much better it will be when there's an inflatable module of twice the size attached:

Bigelow's second prototype, Genesis II, in orbit. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Show Hide image

Why did Julian Assange lose his internet connection?

Rumours of paedophilia have obscured the real reason the WikiLeaks founder has been cut off from the internet. 

In the most newsworthy example of "My house, my rules" this year, Julian Assange's dad (the Ecuadorian embassy in London) has cut off his internet because he's been a bad boy. 

Rumours that the WikiLeaks' founder was WiFi-less were confirmed by Ecuador's foreign ministry late last night, which released a statement saying it has "temporarily restricted access to part of its communications systems in its UK Embassy" where Assange has been granted asylum for the last four years. 

Claims that the embassy disconnected Assange because he had sent sexually explicit messages to an eight-year-old girl —first reported by the US political blog Daily Kos — have been quashed. Wikileaks responded by denying the claims on Twitter, as Ecuador explained the move was taken to prevent Assange's interference with the US election. The decision follows the publication of leaked emails from Hillary Clinton's campaign adviser John Podesta, as well as emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC), by WikiLeaks.

Ecuador "respects the principle of non-intervention in the internal affairs of other states," read the statement, though the embassy have confirmed they will continue to grant Assange asylum. 

Assange first arrived at the Ecuadorian embassy in London in June 2012, after being sought for questioning in Sweden over an allegation of rape, which he denies. WikiLeaks claims this new accusation is a further attempt to frame Assange.  "An unknown entity posing as an internet dating agency prepared an elaborate plot to falsely claim that Julian Assange received US$1M from the Russian government and a second plot to frame him sexually molesting an eight year old girl," reads a news story on the official site.

It is unclear when Assange will be reconnected, although it will presumably be after the US presidential election on 8 November.

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.