Scania switches to fossil-free fuel in its internal fuel services

Vehicle manufacturer drops diesel for bioethanol to reduce CO2 emissions

Cristanol biorefinery in France, which produces bioethanol. Image: AFP/Getty Images

 

The Swedish car maker Scania is switching from fossil-based diesel to renewable bioethanol in a bid to reduce the impact of its own operations on the climate.

The move will cut carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 70 per cent from Scania’s goods transport services at its production facilities in Södertälje, where the company operates trucks to transport components and packaging material between its various production and assembly workshops.

“By switching to ethanol, Scania is demonstrating that sustainable solutions can be achieved – here and now - with technology that is already available today,” says Anders Nielsen, head of production and logistics at Scania.

Scania currently offers a series of climate- and energy-efficient products and services.

Nielsen added: “As a supplier of transport solutions, it is important for us to take the lead in developing sustainable alternative solutions and demonstrate how sustainability and efficiency are linked in practice.”

The company will open a public filling station in Södertälje later in 2012 to make ED95 (ethanol) and bio-gas available for commercial vehicles.

Scania's net sales and net income were SEK87.7bn and SEK9.4bn respectively in 2011.

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