Christianity's top 11 most controversial figures

The Staggers presents its list of most intriguing and contentious Christians: includes Popes, conspi

To add a little context to the wider debate surrounding Benedict XVI's visit to the UK on 16 September, we profile 11 christians (one for each disciple, less the paradoxically condemned Judas) that have provoked controversy, shaped the course of history, and given rise to important questions about the role of religion in society.

And they are:

1. Martin Luther - The original protestant

2. Henry VIII - The Tudor megalomaniac

3. Pope Urban II - Eleventh century Dr. Death

4. Guy Fawkes - Britain's number one conspirator

5. Joan of Arc - The bad-girl of French Catholicism

6. Thomas Cranmer - The craftsmen of royal supremacy

7. Pope Urban VIII - Inquisitor extraordinaire

8. Thomas More - Enemy of the State

9. Pope Pius XII - Hitler's Pope

10. Pope Pius IX - The Anti-semite

11. Jerry Falwell - The televangelist

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.