Diane Abbott. Photo: Getty
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Labour's Diane Abbott stands aside from election campaign for health reasons

The Labour grandee will take a break from her role as shadow home secretary. 

Diane Abbott will stand aside as shadow home secretary "for the period of her ill health", Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said today.

She will be replaced by shadow policing minister Lyn Brown.

The news follows Abbott's withdrawal from two media appearances yesterday, and a much-criticised performance on Dermot Murnaghan's Sky show on Monday night.

Abbott is one of Corbyn's closest allies, and was featured alongside him and shadow chancellor John McDonnell on the front page of today's Daily Mail as part of a "troika" who were "apologists for terror". She has faced bruising press coverage throughout the campaign, with her stumble on LBC over police numbers leading to widespread mockery. The Conservatives' James Cleverley accused her of disliking Britain based on comments she made about systemic racism in 1988. 

She has featured prominently in Conservative attack adverts throughout the campaign, and anecdotes from the doorstep and focus groups suggest that her gaffes have "cut through" with voters. Labour commentators such as Paul Mason have suggested that racism has played a part in this. In February, Abbott revealed that she has faced decades of racist and sexist abuse, writing in the Guardian: "I have had rape threats, death threats, and am referred to routinely as a bitch and/or nigger, and am sent horrible images on Twitter."

In a statement, Labour said: "Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour party, has asked Lyn Brown to stand in for Diane Abbott as shadow home secretary for the period of her ill health."

Corbyn told BBC Breakfast: "I’ll be talking to her later on today – she’s not well at the moment." 

Lyn Brown, 57, is contesting the safe Labour seat of East Ham. She resigned from the shadow cabinet last summer when a vote of no-confidence was brought in Corbyn's leadership, but later rejoined it. 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Photo: Getty
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Donald Trump tweets he is “saddened” – but not about the earthquake in Mexico

Barack Obama and Jeremy Corbyn sent messages of sympathy to Mexico. 

A devastating earthquake in Mexico has killed at least 217 people, with rescue efforts still going on. School children are among the dead.

Around the world, politicians have been quick to offer their sympathy, not least Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, whose wife hails from Mexico. He tweeted: "My thoughts are with all those affected by today's earthquake in Mexico. Pensando en todos los afectados por el terremoto en México hoy" in the early hours of the morning, UK time.

Barack Obama may no longer be an elected politician, but he too offered a heartfelt message to those suffering, and like Corbyn, he wrote some of it in Spanish. "Thinking about our neighbors in Mexico and all our Mexican-American friends tonight. Cuidense mucho y un fuerte abrazo para todos," he tweeted. 

But what about the man now installed in the White House, Donald Trump? The Wall Builder-in-Chief was not idle on Tuesday night - in fact, he shared a message to the world via Twitter an hour after Obama. He too was "saddened" by what he had heard on Tuesday evening, news that he dubbed "the worst ever".

Yes, that's right. The Emmys viewing figures.

"I was saddened to see how bad the ratings were on the Emmys last night - the worst ever," he tweeted. "Smartest people of them all are the "DEPLORABLES."

No doubt Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto will get round to offering the United States his commiserations soon. 

I'm a mole, innit.