A sculpture to commemorate the Kindertransport, built by a survivor. Photo: Getty Images
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Nicholas Winton's other life: a Labour council candidate

Nicholas Winton, who saved over 600 children destined for concentration camps, died yesterday. In his other life, he was also a Labour activist and council candidate.

Nicholas Winton, who as a stockbroker in the late 1930s left the UK and arranged trains to transport Jewish children to the safety of Britain, has died. (You can read a little bit more about him in Jonn's piece here, and in the Telegraph's obituary here.)

But in addition to all of that he was also a Labour activist and perennial candidate in Maidenhead, where he lived. (Then as now, Maidenhead was not particularly fertile Labour territory) His election address gives you a flavour of his modesty, which you can see below:

Thanks to Joe Oliver for tweeting this picture, from a lecture given by Winton's daughter a year ago.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.