Pain management is always fraught. Photo: Getty
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Jill thought she knew best for her father so she kept the morphine coming

Whatever her motivations – and whether she had even been aware of them – she had been hastening his demise.

The call came on Sunday evening, flagged as urgent on the computer. I rang the home number, which was answered by a woman.

“My father is dying of prostate cancer with bony mets,” she explained. “He’s in a lot of pain.”

The medical terminology struck me. “Are you in health care?”

“I’m a nurse. I don’t mean to tell you your job, but I think it’s time for a syringe driver.”

As death approaches, medication taken by mouth can become unreliable. In order to control symptoms, drugs are administered subcutaneously by a device known as a syringe driver. The siting of a driver often heralds the final hours of life. As well as relieving pain and mental distress, the potent drugs used can depress consciousness and respiration, which more often than not hastens the end. This is not euthanasia: it is permissible as the price of effective palliation, the “doctrine of double effect”.

When I arrived at the house, Frank was alone with his daughter, Jill, a neatly dressed woman in her forties who had travelled down from her Northumberland home to nurse him in his final illness. She described how, no matter how much morphine she gave, she didn’t seem able to control his pain. Frank was indeed in a bad way – semi-conscious, markedly confused and rambling – but he didn’t appear objectively to be suffering. There was one brief moment when he did wince. Jill responded instantaneously, spooning in a dose of liquid morphine as a parent might feed a baby.

“How much has he been having?” I asked.

Jill shrugged. “I give him some every time he’s in pain.”

When working out of hours, one has no access to patients’ records – all information has to be gained first-hand. I asked to see the rest of Frank’s medication. In the depths of a laden carrier bag I found plenty of paracetamol and diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory.

“Is he having these?” I asked.

“Oh, no, he’s just on morphine now,” she replied.

Bone pain doesn’t generally respond to morphine alone. One usually prescribes anti-inflammatories and paracetamol; these potentiate the effect of morphine, allowing far less opiate to be used.

I wrote out a schedule, specifying regular doses of the two abandoned drugs, and insisting that Jill note down every dose of morphine given.

It had all taken a long time. Leaving, I bumped into two other women coming in at the gate. They turned out to be Frank’s elderly wife with another daughter. I’d had no idea there was a spouse around. She seemed equally bewildered to meet me, saying that her daughter had taken her out for an evening drive. It was midwinter, and dark outside.

The overdosing on morphine was one thing; quite another was the removal of Frank’s wife before calling the doctor in. Safeguarding children is a familiar concept, but in recent years there’s been a growing realisation that adults are sometimes in need of protection, too. I contacted Frank’s GP first thing in the morning and he convened an urgent safeguarding conference. A troubling picture emerged. Frank’s four children had a lifelong history of rivalry, division and competition for paternal attention. Jill and her sister were allies against the other two, and against their mother. The wider family reported that Jill had descended on the home, taking control of Frank’s treatment and shutting the others out, pulling rank by virtue of her spell in nursing some 15 years earlier.

The conference prohibited Jill from further direct involvement in her father’s care. Treatment optimised, Frank came off virtually all morphine. His confusion resolved completely, and he had another five months of good-quality life. Whatever her motivations – and whether she had even been aware of them – Jill had been hastening his demise. How easy it would have been for an out-of-hours doctor unwittingly to have colluded, taking things at face value and acceding to Jill’s suggestion that the time for a syringe driver was nigh.

This article first appeared in the 16 July 2015 issue of the New Statesman, The Motherhood Trap

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Theresa May’s stage-managed election campaign keeps the public at bay

Jeremy Corbyn’s approach may be chaotic, but at least it’s more authentic.

The worst part about running an election campaign for a politician? Having to meet the general public. Those ordinary folk can be a tricky lot, with their lack of regard for being on-message, and their pesky real-life concerns.

But it looks like Theresa May has decided to avoid this inconvenience altogether during this snap general election campaign, as it turns out her visit to Leeds last night was so stage-managed that she barely had to face the public.

Accusations have been whizzing around online that at a campaign event at the Shine building in Leeds, the Prime Minister spoke to a room full of guests invited by the party, rather than local people or people who work in the building’s office space.

The Telegraph’s Chris Hope tweeted a picture of the room in which May was addressing her audience yesterday evening a little before 7pm. He pointed out that, being in Leeds, she was in “Labour territory”:

But a few locals who spied this picture online claimed that the audience did not look like who you’d expect to see congregated at Shine – a grade II-listed Victorian school that has been renovated into a community project housing office space and meeting rooms.

“Ask why she didn’t meet any of the people at the business who work in that beautiful building. Everyone there was an invite-only Tory,” tweeted Rik Kendell, a Leeds-based developer and designer who says he works in the Shine building. “She didn’t arrive until we’d all left for the day. Everyone in the building past 6pm was invite-only . . . They seemed to seek out the most clinical corner for their PR photos. Such a beautiful building to work in.”

Other tweeters also found the snapshot jarring:

Shine’s founders have pointed out that they didn’t host or invite Theresa May – rather the party hired out the space for a private event: “All visitors pay for meeting space in Shine and we do not seek out, bid for, or otherwise host any political parties,” wrote managing director Dawn O'Keefe. The guestlist was not down to Shine, but to the Tory party.

The audience consisted of journalists and around 150 Tory activists, according to the Guardian. This was instead of employees from the 16 offices housed in the building. I have asked the Conservative Party for clarification of who was in the audience and whether it was invite-only and am awaiting its response.

Jeremy Corbyn accused May of “hiding from the public”, and local Labour MP Richard Burgon commented that, “like a medieval monarch, she simply briefly relocated her travelling court of admirers to town and then moved on without so much as a nod to the people she considers to be her lowly subjects”.

But it doesn’t look like the Tories’ painstaking stage-management is a fool-proof plan. Having uniform audiences of the party faithful on the campaign trail seems to be confusing the Prime Minister somewhat. During a visit to a (rather sparsely populated) factory in Clay Cross, Derbyshire, yesterday, she appeared to forget where exactly on the campaign trail she was:

The management of Corbyn’s campaign has also resulted in gaffes – but for opposite reasons. A slightly more chaotic approach has led to him facing the wrong way, with his back to the cameras.

Corbyn’s blunder is born out of his instinct to address the crowd rather than the cameras – May’s problem is the other way round. Both, however, seem far more comfortable talking to the party faithful, even if they are venturing out of safe seat territory.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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