Demonstrators in Greece hold a large "Oxi" (No) sign aloft. Photo: Getty Images
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Greece votes No

Greece has rejected the proposed bailout in a referendum.

Greece has voted "No" to the Troika's bailout proposals. With over 50 per cent of ballots counted, "No" was in a commanding lead of 60 per cent to 40 per cent.

The result will plunge global markets into uncertainty and tip Europe into further crisis. Greek banks will remain shuttered tomorrow morning while traders across the world brace themselves for further shocks. The prolonging of further liquidity to Greece's banking system will be decided by the European Central Bank on Monday. Francois Hollande, the French President, and Angela Merkel, the German head of government, will also meet tonight to discuss future steps.

But the early signs for a deal are poor. Sigmar Gabriel, Germany's deputy chancellor and the leader of that country's main leftwing party, the SPD, said that Greece had "torn down the last bridges on which Greece and Europe could have moved towards a compromise" by voting against the deal. 

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.