Demonstrators in Greece hold a large "Oxi" (No) sign aloft. Photo: Getty Images
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Greece votes No

Greece has rejected the proposed bailout in a referendum.

Greece has voted "No" to the Troika's bailout proposals. With over 50 per cent of ballots counted, "No" was in a commanding lead of 60 per cent to 40 per cent.

The result will plunge global markets into uncertainty and tip Europe into further crisis. Greek banks will remain shuttered tomorrow morning while traders across the world brace themselves for further shocks. The prolonging of further liquidity to Greece's banking system will be decided by the European Central Bank on Monday. Francois Hollande, the French President, and Angela Merkel, the German head of government, will also meet tonight to discuss future steps.

But the early signs for a deal are poor. Sigmar Gabriel, Germany's deputy chancellor and the leader of that country's main leftwing party, the SPD, said that Greece had "torn down the last bridges on which Greece and Europe could have moved towards a compromise" by voting against the deal. 

New Statesman
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.