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Who nominated who in the 2015 Labour deputy leadership election?

The deputy leadership candidates needed 35 MPs to back them. Who backed who?

Tom Watson, Caroline Flint, Stella Creasy, Ben Bradshaw and Angela Eagle are all on the ballot for the deputy leadership election. Watson, the bookmakers' favourite, will square off against Flint, Creasy, Bradshaw and Eagle. John Healey, who announced his intentions to run, secured 21 nominations before pulling out as he was unable to get the 35 names he amassed.

Rushanara Ali secured 24 nominations before pulling out to guarantee that Creasy, Bradshaw and Eagle all made the ballot. 

The Labour deputy leadership hopefuls needed 35 MPs to nominate them in order to run, out of 232 MPs overall. 

Who nominated who?

Ben Bradshaw (37)

 

Heidi Alexander MP for Lewisham East

Rushanara Ali MP for Bethnal Green and Bow

Clive Betts MP for Sheffield South East

Ben Bradshaw MP for Exeter

Lyn Brown MP for West Ham

Chris Bryant MP for Rhondda

Karen Buck MP for Westminster North

Neil Coyle MP for Bermondsey and Old Southwark

Geraint Davies MP for Swansea West

Thangam Debbonaire MP for Bristol West

Clive Efford MP for Eltham

Chris Evans MP for Islwyn

Frank Field MP for Birkenhead

Paul Flynn MP for Newport West

Helen Goodman MP for Bishop Auckland

Fabian Hamilton MP for Leeds North East

Meg Hillier MP for Hackney South and Shoreditch

Tristram Hunt MP for Stoke-On-Trent Central

Rupa Huq MP for Ealing Central and Acton

Huw Irranca-Davies MP for Ogmore

Alan Johnson MP for Hull West and Hessle

Diana Johnson MP for Hull North

Susan Elan Jones MP for Clwyd South

Sadiq Khan MP for Tooting

Peter Kyle MP for Hove

Gordon Marsden MP for Blackpool South

Kerry McCarthy MP for Bristol East

Catherine McKinnell MP for Newcastle Upon Tyne North

Matthew Pennycook MP for Greenwich and Woolwich

Bridget Phillipson MP for Houghton and Sunderland South

Yasmin Qureshi MP for Bolton South East

Andrew Slaughter MP for Hammersmith

Andrew Smith MP for Oxford East

Keir Starmer MP for Holborn and St Pancras

Emily Thornberry MP for Islington South and Finsbury

Stephen Timms MP for East Ham

Valerie Vaz MP for Walsall South

 

Stella Creasy (35)

Debbie Abrahams MP for Oldham East and Saddleworth

Ruth Cadbury MP for Brentford and Isleworth

Sarah Champion MP for Rotherham

Jenny Chapman MP for Darlington

Jo Cox MP for Batley and Spen

Stella Creasy MP for Walthamstow

Stephen Doughty MP for Cardiff South and Penarth

Louise Ellman MP for Liverpool, Riverside

Kate Green MP for Stretford and Urmston

Kate Hollern MP for Blackburn

Dan Jarvis MP for Barnsley Central

Gerald Jones MP for Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney

Mike Kane MP for Wythenshawe and Sale East

Chris Leslie MP for Nottingham East

Holly Lynch MP for Halifax

Fiona Mactaggart MP for Slough

Ian Murray MP for Edinburgh South

Melanie Onn MP for Great Grimsby

Jamie Reed MP for Copeland

Steve Reed MP for Croydon North

Gavin Shuker MP for Luton South

Karin Smyth MP for Bristol South

Wes Streeting MP for Ilford North

Graham Stringer MP for Blackley and Broughton

Gareth Thomas MP for Harrow West

Stephen Twigg MP for Liverpool, West Derby

Catherine West MP for Hornsey and Wood Green

John Woodcock MP for Barrow and Furness

Madeleine Moon MP for Bridgend

Diane Abbott MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington

Chuka Umunna MP for Streatham

David Lammy MP for Tottenham

Ivan Lewis MP for Bury North

 

Angela Eagle (38)

Margaret Beckett MP for Derby South

Roberta Blackman-Woods MP for City of Durham

Paul Blomfield MP for Sheffield Central

Nick Brown MP for Newcastle Upon Tyne East

Dawn Butler MP for Brent Central

Ann Clwyd MP for Cynon Valley

Julie Cooper MP for Burnley

Maria Eagle MP for Garston and Halewood

Angela Eagle MP for Wallasey

Bill Esterson MP for Sefton Central

Mike Gapes MP for Ilford South

Pat Glass MP for North West Durham

Margaret Greenwood MP for Wirral West

Lilian Greenwood MP for Nottingham South

Nia Griffith MP for Llanelli

Andrew Gwynne MP for Denton and Reddish

John Healey MP for Wentworth and Dearne

Mark Hendrick MP for Preston

Sharon Hodgson MP for Washington and Sunderland West

Kelvin Hopkins MP for Luton North

Seema Malhotra MP for Feltham and Heston

Rachael Maskell MP for York Central

John McDonnell MP for Hayes and Harlington

Alison McGovern MP for Wirral South

Liz McInnes MP for Heywood and Middleton

Michael Meacher MP for Oldham West and Royton

Teresa Pearce MP for Erith and Thamesmead

Stephen Pound MP for Ealing North

Angela Rayner MP for Ashton-Under-Lyne

Christina Rees MP for Neath

Marie Rimmer MP for St Helens South and Whiston

Steve Rotheram MP for Liverpool, Walton

Tulip Siddiq MP for Hampstead and Kilburn

Cat Smith MP for Lancaster and Fleetwood

Jon Trickett MP for Hemsworth

Derek Twigg MP for Halton

Keith Vaz MP for Leicester East

Daniel Zeichner MP for Cambridge

 

Caroline Flint (43)

Hilary Benn MP for Leeds central
Luciana Berger MP for Liverpool, Wavertree
Tom Blenkinsop MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland
Ann Coffey MP for Stockport
Alex Cunningham MP for Stockton North
Nic Dakin MP for Scunthorpe
Simon Danczuk MP for Rochdale
Wayne David MP for Caerphilly
Jim Dowd MP for Lewisham West & Penge
Jack Dromey MP for Birmingham, Erdington
Julie Elliott MP for Sunderland Central
Jim Fitzpatrick MP for Poplar and Limehouse
Caroline Flint MP for Don Valley
Yvonne Fovargue MP for Makerfield
Barry Gardiner MP for Brent North
Mary Glindon MP for North Tyneside
David Hanson MP for Delyn
Carolyn Harris MP for Swansea East
Margaret Hodge MP for Barking
Kate Hoey MP for Vauxhall
George Howarth MP for Knowsley
Graham Jones MP for Hyndburn
Gerald Kaufman MP for Manchester Gorton
Stephen Kinnock MP for Aberavon
Siobhain McDonagh MP for Mitcham and Morden
Pat McFadden MP for Wolverhampton South East
Jessica Morden MP for Newport East
Albert Owen MP for Ynys Mon
Toby Perkins MP for Chesterfield CLP
Johnny Reynolds MP for Stalybridge and Hyde
Emma Reynolds MP for Wolverhampton North East
Joan Ryan MP for Enfield North
Barry Sheerman MP for Huddersfield
Owen Smith MP for Pontypridd
Angela Smith MP for Penistone and Stocksbridge
Gisela Stuart MP for Birmingham, Edgbaston
Nick Thomas-Symonds MP for Torfaen
Anna Turley MP for Redcar
Karl Turner MP for Kingston Upon Hull East
Alan Whitehead MP for Southampton Test
Phil Wilson MP for Sedgefield

 

Tom Watson (62) 

Dave Anderson MP for Blaydon

Jon Ashworth MP for Leicester South

Ian Austin MP for Dudley North

Adrian Bailey MP for West Bromwich West

Kevin Brennan MP for Cardiff West

Richard Burden MP for Birmingham, Northfield

Richard Burgon MP for Leeds East

Liam Byrne MP for Birmingham, Hodge Hill

Ronnie Campbell MP for Blyth Valley

Vernon Coaker MP for Gedling

David Crausby MP for Bolton North East

Jon Cruddas MP for Dagenham

Judith Cummins MP for Bradford South

Jim Cunningham MP for Coventry South

Gloria De Piero MP for Ashfield

Michael Dugher MP for Barnsley East

Paul Farrelly MP for Newcastle-Under-Lyme

Rob Flello MP for Stoke-On-Trent South

Coleen Fletcher MP for Coventry North East

Vicky Foxcroft MP for Lewisham, Deptford

Roger Godsiff MP for Birmingham, Hall Green

Louise Haig MP for Sheffield, Heeley

Harry Harpham MP for Sheffield Brightside & Hillsborough

Sue Hayman MP for Workington

Stephen Hepburn MP for Jarrow

Imran Hussain MP for Bradford East

Kevan Jones MP for North Durham

Helen Jones MP for Warrington North

Barbara Keeley MP for Worsley and Eccles South

Ian Lavery MP for Wansbeck

Emma Lewell-Buck MP for South Shields

Clive Lewis MP for Norwich South

Rebecca Long Bailey MP for Salford and Eccles

Ian Lucas MP for Wrexham

Justin Madders MP for Ellesmere Port and Neston

Khalid Mahmood MP for Birmingham, Perry Barr

Shabana Mahmood MP for Birmingham, Ladywood

Rob Marris MP for Wolverhampton South West

Chris Matheson MP for City of Chester

Stephen McCabe MP for Birmingham, Selly Oak

Andy McDonald MP for Middlesbrough

Conor McGinn MP for St Helens North

Alan Meale MP for Mansfield

Ian Mearns MP for Gateshead

Grahame Morris MP for Easington

Lisa Nandy MP for Wigan

Kate Osamor MP for Edmonton

Jess Phillips MP for Birmingham Yardley

Lucy Powell MP for Manchester Central

Rachel Reeves MP for Leeds West

Geoffrey Robinson MP for Coventry North West

Naz Shah MP for Bradford West

Virendra Sharma MP for Ealing, Southall

Dennis Skinner MP for Bolsover

Ruth Smeeth MP for Stoke-on-Trent North

Jeff Smith MP for Manchester Withington

Nick Smith MP for Blaenau Gwent

John Spellar MP for Warley

Jo Stevens MP for Cardiff Central

Tom Watson MP for West Bromwich East

David Winnick MP for Walsall North

Iain Wright MP for Hartlepool

 

 

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Leader: The unresolved Eurozone crisis

The continent that once aspired to be a rival superpower to the US is now a byword for decline, and ethnic nationalism and right-wing populism are thriving.

The eurozone crisis was never resolved. It was merely conveniently forgotten. The vote for Brexit, the terrible war in Syria and Donald Trump’s election as US president all distracted from the single currency’s woes. Yet its contradictions endure, a permanent threat to continental European stability and the future cohesion of the European Union.

The resignation of the Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi, following defeat in a constitutional referendum on 4 December, was the moment at which some believed that Europe would be overwhelmed. Among the champions of the No campaign were the anti-euro Five Star Movement (which has led in some recent opinion polls) and the separatist Lega Nord. Opponents of the EU, such as Nigel Farage, hailed the result as a rejection of the single currency.

An Italian exit, if not unthinkable, is far from inevitable, however. The No campaign comprised not only Eurosceptics but pro-Europeans such as the former prime minister Mario Monti and members of Mr Renzi’s liberal-centrist Democratic Party. Few voters treated the referendum as a judgement on the monetary union.

To achieve withdrawal from the euro, the populist Five Star Movement would need first to form a government (no easy task under Italy’s complex multiparty system), then amend the constitution to allow a public vote on Italy’s membership of the currency. Opinion polls continue to show a majority opposed to the return of the lira.

But Europe faces far more immediate dangers. Italy’s fragile banking system has been imperilled by the referendum result and the accompanying fall in investor confidence. In the absence of state aid, the Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena, the world’s oldest bank, could soon face ruin. Italy’s national debt stands at 132 per cent of GDP, severely limiting its firepower, and its financial sector has amassed $360bn of bad loans. The risk is of a new financial crisis that spreads across the eurozone.

EU leaders’ record to date does not encourage optimism. Seven years after the Greek crisis began, the German government is continuing to advocate the failed path of austerity. On 4 December, Germany’s finance minister, Wolfgang Schäuble, declared that Greece must choose between unpopular “structural reforms” (a euphemism for austerity) or withdrawal from the euro. He insisted that debt relief “would not help” the immiserated country.

Yet the argument that austerity is unsustainable is now heard far beyond the Syriza government. The International Monetary Fund is among those that have demanded “unconditional” debt relief. Under the current bailout terms, Greece’s interest payments on its debt (roughly €330bn) will continually rise, consuming 60 per cent of its budget by 2060. The IMF has rightly proposed an extended repayment period and a fixed interest rate of 1.5 per cent. Faced with German intransigence, it is refusing to provide further funding.

Ever since the European Central Bank president, Mario Draghi, declared in 2012 that he was prepared to do “whatever it takes” to preserve the single currency, EU member states have relied on monetary policy to contain the crisis. This complacent approach could unravel. From the euro’s inception, economists have warned of the dangers of a monetary union that is unmatched by fiscal and political union. The UK, partly for these reasons, wisely rejected membership, but other states have been condemned to stagnation. As Felix Martin writes on page 15, “Italy today is worse off than it was not just in 2007, but in 1997. National output per head has stagnated for 20 years – an astonishing . . . statistic.”

Germany’s refusal to support demand (having benefited from a fixed exchange rate) undermined the principles of European solidarity and shared prosperity. German unemployment has fallen to 4.1 per cent, the lowest level since 1981, but joblessness is at 23.4 per cent in Greece, 19 per cent in Spain and 11.6 per cent in Italy. The youngest have suffered most. Youth unemployment is 46.5 per cent in Greece, 42.6 per cent in Spain and 36.4 per cent in Italy. No social model should tolerate such waste.

“If the euro fails, then Europe fails,” the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, has often asserted. Yet it does not follow that Europe will succeed if the euro survives. The continent that once aspired to be a rival superpower to the US is now a byword for decline, and ethnic nationalism and right-wing populism are thriving. In these circumstances, the surprise has been not voters’ intemperance, but their patience.

This article first appeared in the 08 December 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Brexit to Trump