Tessa Jowell, the frontrunner for Labour's mayoral nomination. Photo: Getty Images
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Tessa Jowell secures the backing of more than half Labour's local authority leaders

Tessa Jowell's campaign has recieved another boost with the endorsements of more than half of London Labour local authority leaders. 

13 of the London Labour party’s 21 local authority leaders have endorsed Tessa Jowell’s bid for the party’s mayoral nomination in an open letter to the New Statesman.

The council leaders – who come from across the capital and include the elected Mayors of Hackney, Jules Pipe, and Newham, Sir Robin Wales – highlight Jowell’s popularity. “Labour hasn’t won a general election or a mayoral election since 2005,” the council leaders warn. The party “must start winning elections again, starting with the London mayoral election in 2016”. They describe Jowell as the candidate with “the best prospect of success in that contest”, highlighting a recent poll that found she was the only candidate who polled above Zac Goldsmith, the likely Conservative candidate, beating him by 57 per cent to 43 per cent.

The council leaders have been joined by three Labour group leaders, Emma Dent-Coad, Adam Hug and Alison Moore, who represent the party in opposition on Kensington, Westminster and Barnet councils.

The full letter is below:

Labour hasn't won a general election or mayoral election since 2005. The Labour Party must start winning elections again, starting with the London mayoral election in 2016.

We believe that our work across our boroughs to promote ambition, aspiration, jobs, and growth, together with our support for the most vulnerable in our communities provides a strong base for Labour success. But it's vital that Labour chooses the Mayoral candidate who can reach out to voters across London - and recent polls show that Tessa Jowell would defeat the likely Tory candidate by 57% to 43%.

Tessa will provide the Labour Party with the best prospect of success in that contest. Her One London message represents the values and visions that we share, and she has a record of delivery for Londoners that is unparalleled. We are proud to endorse Tessa as Labour's best chance of winning again in London.

Cllr Jas Athwal (Leader, Redbridge council)

Cllr Julian Bell (Leader, Ealing council)

Cllr Stephen Cowan (Leader, Hammersmith and Fulham council)

Cllr Sarah Hayward (Leader, Camden council)

Cllr Denise Hyland (Leader, Greenwich council)

Cllr Peter John (Leader, Southwark council)

Cllr Clair Kober (Leader, Haringey council)

Cllr Tony Newman (Leader, Croydon council)

Cllr Lib Peck (Leader, Lambeth council)

Mayor Jules Pipe (elected Mayor, Hackney council)

Cllr Chris Robbins (Leader, Waltham Forest council)

Cllr Darren Rodwell (Leader, Barking and Dagenham council)

Mayor Sir Robin Wales (elected Mayor, Newham council)

Cllr Emma Dent-Coad (Labour group leader, Kensington and Chelsea council)

Cllr Adam Hug (Labour group leader, Westminster council)

Cllr Alison Moore (Labour group leader, Barnet council)

 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

Photo: Getty
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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.