The face of Labour's In campaign? Photo: Getty Images
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Labour's next split: the referendum

Labour may soon find itself just as riven by Europe as the Conservative Party.

Chuka Umunna has called on Labour to be part of a "broad, grassroots campaign" to keep Britain in the European Union, warning that a narrow campaign would see the party and the In campaign cast as "a cosy club of established political parties and big businessess".

The remarks come after Alistair Darling, the former Labour Chancellor and head of Better Together, the cross-party campaign to keep Scotland in the United Kingdom, slapped down Andy Burnham's suggestion that the cross-party campaign for the Union was responsible for Scottish Labour's travails. 

"That explanation doesn’t explain why we were trounced in 2011 or why we lost in 2007," Darling tells the Times, "The Scottish Labour party’s problems are greater than that. Never forget we won the referendum.”

Labour's shadow business secretary and former leadership candidate set out his ideas for how the referendum campaign should be fought and won in an interview with Progress magazine. He also shed further light on why he - along with his campaign lieutenants - opted to endorse Liz Kendall's campaign for the leadership

"She has asked all the questions, she has made the arguments that I would have made if I was still in the contest," Umunna said. The MP for Streatham believes that the "three challenges" Labour must tackle are: "how do you deliver good public services in a fiscally cold climate; secondly, how do you harness all of the energy that technological change is bringing to create opportunities when that technology is destroying jobs people have done for generations; and thirdly, how do we pay our way in the world?" Kendall, Umunna, believes, "has started to map out the answers in a fearless way, a courageous way."

But it is the question of Europe and how to respond to it that may come to dominate Labour's thinking over the coming months.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics. 

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.