Sian Berry has received Caroline Lucas's backing. Photo: YouTube screengrab
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A blow for Bennett? Caroline Lucas backs Sian Berry for the Greens' London Mayoral candidate

"Dynamic, articulate and engaging."

Caroline Lucas has announced she is backing Green politician Siân Berry to be her party's candidate for the London mayoralty.

Berry was the party's candidate in the 2008 mayoral election, and has held high-profile positions in the party for a number of years. She served as principal speaker (what is now a leadership position) from 2006-7, and is a Green councillor on Camden Council, for Highgate ward.

She has burnished her environmental credentials in the capital, through campaigns such as a drive to reduce 4x4s being driven in urban areas, a campaign to replace inefficient boilers, and a position covering roads and sustainable transport for the Campaign for Better Transport.

An experienced London Green then, and one who Lucas clearly deems worth endorsing. She commented:

Sian Berry has all the qualities and experience to make a really effective London mayoral candidate for the Greens.

Dynamic, articulate and engaging, she’s well known and widely admired, particularly for her outstanding work on environmental issues in the city. An experienced and effective local councillor and campaigner, she has a strong track record of promoting equality and social justice as well as sustainability.

Sian has used her position to forge excellent links with a wide range of groups in the city, and is committed to running a grassroots, open and inclusive campaign to reach and engage as many Londoners as possible. I’m delighted to endorse her candidacy.

But a side-effect of this endorsement is a blow for party leader Natalie Bennett. The talk is that Bennett is deliberating whether or not to run to be the Green candidate for London mayor.

It would be a high-stakes move for her to do so, because if she were to lose to another contender then it would surely mean the end of her leadership when it comes to the Greens' internal elections next year. Lucas's endorsement of Berry suggests that Bennett would not be the party's first choice for the mayoral race.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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