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Stella Creasy announces she will stand for the deputy leadership of the Labour party

Stella Creasy, the popular MP for Walthamstow, will challenge Tom Watson and Caroline Flint for the post.

Stella Creasy has entered the race to replace Harriet Harman as deputy leader of the Labour Party.

Creasy, who was elected MP for Walthamstow in 2010, is one of the highest profile members of the parliamentary Labour Party, and has carved out a niche as one of Britain's most successful campaigners, on issues ranging from payday loans to women's representation on banknotes.

Writing for the Mirror, Creasy has pledged to "restore fire and faith" in the Labour movement. Creasy is adored by the membership and will be heavyweight opposition to both Caroline Flint and Tom Watson, but may have an uphill battle to secure 35 nominations and a place on the ballot paper.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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Westminster terror attack: What we know so far

The attack, which left a police officer and bystanders dead, was an attack on democracy. 

We had just wrapped up recording this week's podcast and I was on my way back to Westminster when it happened: the first terrorist attack on Parliament since the killing of Airey Neave in 1979. You can read an account of the day here.

Here's what we know so far:

  • Four people, including the attacker, have died following a terrorist attack at Westminster. Keith Palmer, a police officer, was killed defending Parliament as the attacker attempted to rush the gates.
  • 29 people are in hospital, seven in critical condition.
  • Three French high school students are among those who were injured in the attack.
  • The attacker, who was known to the security services, has been named as Khalid Masood, a 52-year-old British born man from Birmingham, is believed to have been a lone wolf though he was inspired by international terrorist attacks. 

The proximity of so many members of the press - including George, who has written up his experience here - meant that it was very probably the most well-documented terrorist attack in British history. But it wasn't an attack on the press, though I'd be lying to you if I said I wasn't thinking about what might have happened if we had finished recording a little earlier.

It was an attack on our politicians and our Parliament and what it represents: of democracy and, ultimately, the rights of all people to self-determination and self-government. It's a reminder too of the risk that everyone who enters politics take and how lucky we are to have them.

It was also a reminder of something I take for granted every day: that if an attack happens, I get to run away from it while the police run towards it. One of their number made the ultimate sacrifice yesterday and many more police and paramedics had to walk towards the scene at a time when they didn't know if there was another attacker out there.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.