Jim Murphy, who has resigned: Not waving but... Photo: Getty
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Jim Murphy resigns as leader of Scottish Labour

Jim Murphy has resigned his position after narrowly surviving a no-confidence vote.

Jim Murphy has resigned as Scottish Labour leader after narrowly surviving  a vote of no confidence in his leadership from the party's ruling NEC by three votes.

He will leave in June, allowing a new leader to take over in the summer. 

He told reporters: "I'll take some time to reflect, I'll always be on call if anyone seeks any point in calling me, I won't be a back-seat driver, I will offer my permanent, unconditional support to my successor. I will never leave the Labour Party - I love the Labour Party and the Labour Party will be back, it'll be back strong because it's built from an idea, not from machine politics. We'll be back, we'll win again."

He criticised Len McCluskey of the Unite union, who had called for him to go, saying that the union boss had blamed him for the wider election defeat of Labour. "That is a grotesque insult to the Scottish Labour party. It's a grotesque insult to thousands of volunteers from someone who pays occasional fleeting visits to our great country."

Murphy indicated he would recommend a one member, one vote policy for choosing his replacement.

His rivals paid tribute to him on Twitter, with the SNP's Nicola Sturgeon saying Murphy "deserves credit for standing up for what he believes in".

The Conservatives' Scottish leader, Ruth Davidson said he leaves a "tough gig" for whoever comes next:

 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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Children from "just managing" families most excluded from grammar schools

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner said grammar schools "offer nothing to most kids".

Children from "just about managing" families are unlikely to benefit from an expansion of grammar schools because they don't get accepted in the first place, research from the Sutton Trust has found.

The educational charity also found that disadvantaged white British pupils were the least likely among a range of ethnic groups to get access to elite state school education. 

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner said: “The Tories are failing our children. They should be delivering a country that works for everyone but all they have to offer is a plan to build an education system that only helps a handful of already privileged children.

"The evidence is clear - grammar schools reinforce advantage and offer nothing to most kids."

Theresa May launched her premiership with both a pledge to make Britain work for the "just managing" families (consequently termed Jams), and a promise to consider expanding grammar schools. 

The Sutton Trust researchers used the Income Deprivation Affecting Children index to compare access rates to those defined "just about managing" by the Resolution Foundation. 

They found that even non-disadvantaged pupils living in deprived neighbourhoods are barely more likely to attend grammar schools than those in the poorest. The report stated: "This is a strong indication that the ‘just managing’ families are not being catered for by the current grammar school system."

The Sutton Trust also found different ethnic groups benefited differently from grammar schools.

Disadvantaged Black pupils made up just 0.8 per cent of pupils in 2016, while disadvantaged white British pupils made up roughly 0.7 per cent, although disadvantaged white non-British children fared slightly better. Among disadvantaged groups, Asian pupils made up a substantial proportion of grammar school pupils. 

Sutton Trust chairman Sir Peter Lampl said: “Today’s research raises concerns about the government’s plans to use new grammars as a vehicle for social mobility. We need to get existing grammars moving in the right direction before we consider expanding their number.”

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.