Jim Murphy, who has resigned: Not waving but... Photo: Getty
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Jim Murphy resigns as leader of Scottish Labour

Jim Murphy has resigned his position after narrowly surviving a no-confidence vote.

Jim Murphy has resigned as Scottish Labour leader after narrowly surviving  a vote of no confidence in his leadership from the party's ruling NEC by three votes.

He will leave in June, allowing a new leader to take over in the summer. 

He told reporters: "I'll take some time to reflect, I'll always be on call if anyone seeks any point in calling me, I won't be a back-seat driver, I will offer my permanent, unconditional support to my successor. I will never leave the Labour Party - I love the Labour Party and the Labour Party will be back, it'll be back strong because it's built from an idea, not from machine politics. We'll be back, we'll win again."

He criticised Len McCluskey of the Unite union, who had called for him to go, saying that the union boss had blamed him for the wider election defeat of Labour. "That is a grotesque insult to the Scottish Labour party. It's a grotesque insult to thousands of volunteers from someone who pays occasional fleeting visits to our great country."

Murphy indicated he would recommend a one member, one vote policy for choosing his replacement.

His rivals paid tribute to him on Twitter, with the SNP's Nicola Sturgeon saying Murphy "deserves credit for standing up for what he believes in".

The Conservatives' Scottish leader, Ruth Davidson said he leaves a "tough gig" for whoever comes next:

 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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