Galloway gone. Image: Getty.
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George Galloway loses his seat in Bradford West to Labour's Naz Shah

Respect's only MP loses his seat. 

George Galloway, the Respect party's only MP,  has lost his seat in Bradford West. He was trounced by Labour candidate Naz Shah, selected for the seat after the original candidate, Amina Ali, stood down after four days. Shah won by a majority of over 11,000, more than doubling Galloway's result and bettering his majority in the constituency's 2012 by-election. 

Shah gained notoriety early in the campaign for an open letter explaining her motivations for standing. Shah's mother was a victim of domestic violence who was imprisoned for murder after killing her husband, and in the letter the Labour candidate explained that her selection was "not really about me, it's the dream of my mother". 

Shah also wrote about her own forecd marriage at age 15, which Galloway then called into question during his campaign. As Aisha Gill explained in a piece for us earlier this week:

Despite George Galloway’s success in courting female Muslim voters in Bradford in the 2012 election, he has failed to grasp the context and complexities of forced marriage, and has proven insensitive to Shah’s own history of abuse....

In many ways, the stories of Naz and Zoora Shah are reflected in the experiences of Muslim women in Britain, especially in terms of domestic violence and castigation of the victim rather than the perpetrator. I hope that the people of Bradford, including the women, will challenge the patriarchal structures deeply embedded in Bradford West and come out in droves to vote on 7 May. 

Galloway is also accused of tweeting out his party's exit poll before voting ended yesterday, which is against electoral laws, and was reported to police by Bradford Council's returning officer. West Yorkshire Police is reviewing the incident. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.

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David Cameron is enlisting a tactic from a Private Eye cartoon to get young people to vote

CringeyMcCringeFace. 

Your mole was heartened to learn last week David Cameron is concerned about the youth vote in the upcoming EU referendum – so much so that he has recruited some bona fide yoof experts to get them to the polling station.

We waited with baited breath to see what the experts – Facebook, Uber, a brand called Snap Fashion, and purveyors of blokey news The Lad Bible – would come up with in their brainstorming session. A sophisticated Facebeook ad campaign? Polling station Ubers? Get the lads out on the doorsteps?

Instead, the wise millennial prophets (specifically the founder of Snap Fashion) came up with "VoteyMcVoteFace", a campaign in which young people would share pictures of their "vote face" on social media, which launched over the weekend. Because the young love selfies, you see. And they all wanted that boat to have that silly name

According to the Financial Times, a source said David Cameron was pleased with the idea. "The PM believes it is essential that we all do everything we can to encourage more young people to register to vote in a referendum that will have such a huge impact on their future."

He may be less pleased to know that the idea was in fact touted before - according to James Cook's Twitter feed, in Private Eye:

Your mole hasn't ascertained which issue the cartoon appeared in, though images of it were being shared as early as 13 May

Great minds think alike. Your mole would have opted for Quiet Millennial Batpeople, personally. 

I'm a mole, innit.