An increasingly rare sight. Photo: Getty
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Whatever happened to the election posters in our windows?

You could always tell it was election time from the posters in people's windows. Where have they vanished to?

There was a time – not so long ago – when you knew there was an election in the air because house and flat windows were suddenly adorned with posters – red, blue and yellow – telling the passer-by that this house was voting Labour/Conservative/Liberal (as was).

But here we are amidst the ‘most exciting election campaign ever’ and there’s not a window poster to be seen. I live in a marginal constituency, and I work in another, and despite my best efforts to date, I have seen none.

It’s a pity; not just because the posters added to the general excitement (and made for very useful TV pictures to illustrate which party might be winning on the doorstep)) but because it was always fascinating to discover that that slightly stuck-up lady down the road was in fact a socialist and that the nice bloke on the other side of the road was a Tory.

It was also great for morale if you were a party worker, either delivering leaflets or knocking on doors, to see a street festooned with window posters advertising your candidate.

But those days appear to have gone. It’s been a gradual trend over the past few elections which now seems to have reached some sort of apotheosis.

But why? Is it because we have all migrated online and we’re still busy putting up posters but these are now done online on Twitter Facebook or elsewhere?

Or is it because we are all now so privatised, and perhaps wary, and think it’s better to keep our political opinions to ourselves?

Or is it because, despite the excitement of the politicians, pundits and activists – this election has left the general population unmoved? And could it be that I speak to soon, that after the leaders’ debates campaign fever will really take a grip and our streets will once more become a sea of red, blue, yellow, green and purple?

Maybe, or maybe not; and if it’s the latter it's a tad worrying. For if this campaign, clearly the most unpredictable in living memory, doesn’t stir the blood of the average voter, then political disillusionment is even more profound than any of us might have thought and our democracy is in deep trouble.

So come on, it’s time to come out, open that envelope from your party of choice and show the world your political colours.

Photo: Getty
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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.