Ed Balls at the Labour conference in Manchester last year. Photograph: Getty Images.
Show Hide image

We're only cutting spending to 1964 levels - Balls mocks the Tories' new defence

Shadow chancellor says the Conservatives have blundered by admitting day-to-day spending will be reduced to its lowest level for more than 50 years. 

The biggest of the Labour foxes that George Osborne sought to shoot in his Budget was the line that he's taking public spending "back to the 1930s". After last year's Autumn Statement exposed him to this attack (with the state forecast to shrink to just 35.2 per cent of GDP in 2019-20), the Chancellor announced that expenditure would now stand at 36 per cent: merely the lowest level since 1999-2000. As I noted earlier, this was before any of Labour's major spending increases to health, education and other areas, but it's a more comfortable comparison for the Chancellor than The Road To Wigan Pier

But at his usual post-Budget briefing for lobby journalists, Ed Balls (who I recently profiled) highlighted an OBR table which he said showed "spending on day-to-day public services by 2018 falls to its lowest share of GDP since 1938". Midway through Balls's take, the Tory Treasury Twitter account riposted that spending actually falls to its lowest level since 1964

Labour have since pointed out that the Tories have "clearly misread the OBR’s print. The OBR were referring to the 2019 level when making the claim on 1964." 

The relevant passage in the OBR document states

Relative to the size of the economy, nominal government consumption is forecast to fall from 19.7 per cent of GDP in 2014 to 16.1 per cent of GDP by 2019. This is less of a fall than we forecast in December, but would still leave government consumption as a share of GDP equal to its level in 1964 and would be the joint lowest level in consistent National Accounts data going back to 1948. On a quarterly basis, government consumption falls to 15.9 per cent of GDP at the end of 2018. This is marginally above its previous low of 15.8 per cent, again in 1964.

Alerted to the Tories' ripsote by a journalist, Balls immediately spotted a chance to open a new line of attack. "Is that a boast?" he asked incredulously. "What was the David Cameron thing about too many tweets make a .... too many tweets make a Treasury special adviser would be the way I would put it", he quipped, before clarifying (with his past job in mind): "A Tory Treasury special adviser". 

He concluded: "If I was George Osborne I would have said: 'Don't press send'". A Labour aide later told me: "If the Tories want a row about whether this is the lowest level of day-to-day spending on public services for 50 years or 80 years, it’s fine by us." 

And Balls has another new line to deploy: that there is (in the words of the OBR) "a sharp acceleration" in the pace of spending cuts after 2015-16.  As chart 1.3 of the OBR document makes clear, the planned fiscal tightening dwarfs anything seen in this parliament.

For Cameron and Osborne, who have sought to give the impression that most of the pain is over, it is an uncomfortable truth. Expect Balls to raise it repeatedly between now and election day. "I have to say, I thought George Osborne would try and find ways to change things and he's actually left it all the same," he told journalists. "It was extreme yesterday, it's extreme today and it will be extreme tomorrow."

P.S. Here are Labour's calculations, based on data from the House of Commons library, in full. As they show, spending in 2018 falls to 16.068 per cent of GDP, lower than the 16.073 per cent seen in 1964. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496