Andrew Mitchell, one of the Coalition's major players in the early years, now faces a career on the fringes. (Photo: Getty)
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Plebgate: Andrew Mitchell agrees to pay £80,000 in damages to PC Toby Rowland

Andrew Mitchell's two-year legal battle has ended in the Sutton Coldfield MP paying £80,000 in damages.

Andrew Mitchell, the former Chief Whip and International Development Secretary, has paid £80,000 in libel damages to PC Toby Rowland, the police officer at the centre of the "Plebgate" affair. 

At the end of a libel trial last year, brought by  Mitchell against the Sun, a judge ruled that Mitchell had used the "politically toxic word pleb" in his altercation with Rowland and other officers at th gates of Downing Street.  Rowland’s solicitor, Jeremy Clarke-Williams, told Mr Justice Warby: “The payment of £80,000 damages by Mr Mitchell sets the seal on PC Rowland’s vindication, as well as providing compensation for the injury to his reputation and the distress caused to him and his family over many months.”

He added: “PC Rowland never felt that the events in Downing Street were anything more than a minor incident. He was not responsible for the publicity which followed and would have much preferred that the whole matter had never entered the public domain. He now simply wishes to be left in peace to continue his police career.”

It is estimated that Mitchell's legal bills will reach about £3m.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.