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Labour hit Cameron on debates - but the status quo favours Miliband

Labour have released a video attacking David Cameron for ducking out of the debates. But it may well be Ed Miliband who has the most to gain if they don't take place. 

Labour have released a video contrasting the David Cameron of 2009-10 - who thought televised debates were the best thing since sliced bread - with the David Cameron of 2014-5 - who has absolutely no intention in taking part in the debates. 

The party badly needs the issue to stay in the news if they're to have any hope of securing the debate that the Labour leadership believe will allow Ed Miliband to overcome the public's negative perceptions of him. But in the absence of a particularly striking third-day angle for the story, it seems likely that the Prime Minister will get away with sabotaging the debates.

That might not be as bad news for Labour as either Team Miliband or Downing Street suppose. Yes, some of the public opprobium towards Miliband is due to a hostile media. But the some of it is down to Miliband and his team. It wasn't the fault of the Sun that Miliband was unable to name the price of a weekly shop, something that, in the words of one Labour strategist: "I would never let even a council candidate leave the office without that information" or the malice of the Mail that caused Miliband to claim he "feels respect" when he sees a white van.  The danger for Labour in the debates is it is easy to imagine Miliband beating Cameron heavily - but it's equally plausible that he could self-destruct.

As for the Conservative campaign, yes, the messaging is disciplined and the campaign is slick. But the polls don't seem to be moving, their only plausible coalition partner is flatlining, they have realistic hopes of making Labour gains in just five seats, and will certainly lose at least twice that to Labour. A lot of the narrative around the Tory campaign is based on the idea, as I say on this week's podcast, that when the voters see the whites of Miliband's eyes, they will vote Conservative. If that doesn't happen, CCHQ's campaign will go down in history as a bore-a-thon that was too scared of Ed Miliband to take him on directly. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.