The Treasury has put together data on how its policies impact on people. Ministers have been sluggish at using it. (Photo:Getty)
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Hard choices lie ahead - here's how the next government might make them

The next government can use data to make cuts more effectively and in a fairer way than this one

One of the unforeseen consequences of coalition, combined with fixed-term Parliaments, is that we currently have a lame-duck government. Nothing is happening in terms of government policies – instead ministers are promising, on behalf of their own party not the government as a whole, to do things if they are elected to govern alone. The consequence has been the announcement or reannouncement of a series of gimmicks (for example, benefit sanctions for addicts refusing treatment) that the government had sensibly previously dismissed as impractical or counterproductive.

So civil servants aren’t doing any policy work. Instead, they are preparing for the really big event of the first few months of the next Parliament – the spending review.  As the Office of Budget Responsibility has pointed out, the government’s current “plans”, set out in the Autumn Statement, imply that total public spending, relative to GDP, would fall to its lowest level in 80 years.  The OBR also made it clear that these were simply assertions by the government as to what it would do – there are no actual spending plans as yet beyond 2015-16. For this reason, they should not be taken that seriously; indeed, the definitive survey of UK macroeconomists by the Centre for Macroeconomics found that only 1 in 10 thought the government’s plans were credible.

But there will be a spending review. And there will be, in the usual cliché, “tough choices” – even tougher than usual. As FlipChartRick’s venn diagram memorably puts it, anybody who thinks that you can balance the budget, not put up taxes and maintain public services at a reasonable standard is “living in LaLa land”.

Before the 2010 spending review, the Prime Minister said “we are all in this together”.  But of course, and inevitably, some individuals and groups lost out more or less than others. That doesn’t make the decisions taken then “unfair”; some were deliberate political choices, made by an elected government in the full knowledge of the consequences; some reflected the patterns of existing public spending and services.

However, any government has both a moral and a legal obligation to do its best to understand the consequences of its decisions – preferably in advance.  In particular, the 2010 Equality Act imposes a requirement on the government to take account of the impact of its decisions on equality of opportunity between different groups.   Since 2011, the Equality and Human Rights Commission has been looking at how that worked in practice in the Treasury and Whitehall in the 2010 Spending Review and since – and what lessons can be learned for the next Parliament. 

The EHRC also commissioned NIESR, and my colleague Howard Reed at Landman Economics, to model the overall impact of tax and spending decisions.  There is more about the background here; and more about our findings here.

 I would sum our findings as two-fold. First, the Treasury did its best (and better than it ever did before) with limited resources and inevitably imperfect data, to analyse the consequences of tax and spending decisions taken in this Parliament on different groups. Considerable progress has been made, and they deserve credit.  But, second, that with relatively limited extra effort and resources more could easily be done; and, perhaps more importantly, that if more analysis had been done decisions might well have been different.  One chart makes the point. It is difficult (although, admittedly, not impossible) to believe that a government genuinely committed to the principle of “we’re all in this together” would have deliberately chosen to implement a set of measures that bore far more heavily on low-income disabled families than any other single group.

Today, however, the EHRC publishes its final report, and it looks forwards not backward.  It makes five key recommendations:

  • Making sure the government has the best possible advice by nominating a body to have overall responsibility for advising Ministers on the impacts of tax and spending decisions on different people in society, including women, ethnic minorities and disabled people.
  • Assessing the combined effects on people of different decisions.  Decisions in different departments which affect women for example, should be assessed together for their total impacts.
  • Improving the coverage of evidence and analysis in the Equalities Impact Statement published alongside major government announcements, such as budgets and reviews of spending.
  • Improving the quality of data by engaging further with government departments to clarify expectations and reach a common and agreed approach on different types and sources of acceptable data and evidence.

"The EHRC, not me, is responsible for the recommendations. But for what it is worth, both as a researcher and as a former senior civil servant in the Treasury, DWP and elsewhere, I think they are practical, reasonable, and implementable; and that they would deliver a meaningful improvement in the quality of analysis available to Ministers when they make those inevitable "hard choices". "

Jonathan Portes is director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research and former chief economist at the Cabinet Office.

Photo: Getty
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Jeremy Corbyn sat down on train he claimed was full, Virgin says

The train company has pushed back against a viral video starring the Labour leader, in which he sat on the floor.

Seats were available on the train where Jeremy Corbyn was filmed sitting on the floor, Virgin Trains has said.

On 16 August, a freelance film-maker who has been following the Labour leader released a video which showed Corbyn talking about the problems of overcrowded trains.

“This is a problem that many passengers face every day, commuters and long-distance travellers. Today this train is completely ram-packed,” he said. Is it fair that I should upgrade my ticket whilst others who might not be able to afford such a luxury should have to sit on the floor? It’s their money I would be spending after all.”

Commentators quickly pointed out that he would not have been able to claim for a first-class upgrade, as expenses rules only permit standard-class travel. Also, campaign expenses cannot be claimed back from the taxpayer. 

Today, Virgin Trains released footage of the Labour leader walking past empty unreserved seats to film his video, which took half an hour, before walking back to take another unreserved seat.

"CCTV footage taken from the train on August 11 shows Mr Corbyn and his team walked past empty, unreserved seats in coach H before walking through the rest of the train to the far end, where his team sat on the floor and started filming.

"The same footage then shows Mr Corbyn returning to coach H and taking a seat there, with the help of the onboard crew, around 45 minutes into the journey and over two hours before the train reached Newcastle.

"Mr Corbyn’s team carried out their filming around 30 minutes into the journey. There were also additional empty seats on the train (the 11am departure from King’s Cross) which appear from CCTV to have been reserved but not taken, so they were also available for other passengers to sit on."

A Virgin spokesperson commented: “We have to take issue with the idea that Mr Corbyn wasn’t able to be seated on the service, as this clearly wasn’t the case.

A spokesman for the Corbyn campaign told BuzzFeed News that the footage was a “lie”, and that Corbyn had given up his seat for a woman to take his place, and that “other people” had also sat in the aisles.

Owen Smith, Corbyn's leadership rival, tried a joke:

But a passenger on the train supported Corbyn's version of events.

Both Virgin Trains and the Corbyn campaign have been contacted for further comment.

UPDATE 17:07

A spokesperson for the Jeremy for Labour campaign commented:

“When Jeremy boarded the train he was unable to find unreserved seats, so he sat with other passengers in the corridor who were also unable to find a seat. 

"Later in the journey, seats became available after a family were upgraded to first class, and Jeremy and the team he was travelling with were offered the seats by a very helpful member of staff.

"Passengers across Britain will have been in similar situations on overcrowded, expensive trains. That is why our policy to bring the trains back into public ownership, as part of a plan to rebuild and transform Britain, is so popular with passengers and rail workers.”

A few testimonies from passengers who had their photos taken with Corbyn on the floor can be found here