The PM condemned the "sickening murder" of Moaz al Kasasbeh. Photo: YouTube screengrab
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Cameron condemns "sickening murder" of Jordanian pilot burned alive by Islamic State

The Prime Minister says the brutal attack has strengthened international resolve to defeat the extremist militants.

David Cameron has condemned the "sickening murder" of the Jordanian pilot burned alive by Islamic State (IS).

Speaking at the beginning of PMQs today, he told the House of Commons:

I'm sure the whole house will join me in condemning the sickening murders in Syria of Japanese journalist Kenji Goto and the Jordanian pilot Lieutenant Moaz al-Kasasbeh. I'm sure the thoughts and prayers of the whole House will be with their families at this very difficult time . . .

I can assure the House that we will not stop until the murderous Isil extremists behind this, and their poisonous ideology are eradicated.

The Prime Minister has also commented separately that the barbaric act against the pilot will only serve to "strengthen" international resolve to defeat the militant extremists:

These terrorists' brutal behaviour will only strengthen our resolve. We stand in solidarity with our Jordanian friends and we will continue to work with them and our other Coalition partners to defeat Isil.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.