The Spanish Civil War. Photo: STF/AFP/Getty Images
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Limehouse III

The eccentric opponents faced by Clement Attlee in 1929.

In 1929, Clement Attlee had interesting opponents. The Communist Walter Tapsell went on to fight in the Spanish civil war in the first company of the British battalion, named the “Major Attlee Company” after the Labour leader. Tapsell was killed in the retreat from Aragon in 1938. His body
was never found.

The Liberal candidate was Jasper Jocelyn John Addis. In 1933, he was declared bankrupt; in 1947, he was struck off as a solicitor. Addis was jailed for fraud in 1954, having claimed that his life was in danger from the financier and alleged war profiteer George Dawson.

Meanwhile, the Conservative Evan Morgan (the second Viscount Tredegar) was a papal chamberlain, occultist, spy and owner of a boxing kangaroo. After the election, it was reported that one of his supporters had failed to turn up to his own wedding, after he was beaten up while canvassing.

This article first appeared in the 08 January 2015 issue of the New Statesman, The Churchill Myth

New Statesman
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.