Cameron, like Syriza, has caused uncertainty in the EU. Photo: Getty
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The irony of arch EU prevaricator David Cameron crying "economic uncertainty" over Syriza's win

The Prime Minister is concerned about the financial instability Syriza's win could bring to Europe – when he's the one promising a referendum that would be deeply destabilising.

So tweeted our Prime Minister following the Greek general election results over the weekend. The Greek electorate voted the anti-austerity, left-wing party Syriza into power.

The fear resulting from Syriza's win is that it could lead to Greece exiting the eurozone. Its leader, and now the Greek Prime Minister, Alexis Tsipras' pledge is to renegotiate the terms of the country's massive international bailout to stop austerity hitting its citizens so hard. Anxiety about this meaning Grexit is on the horizon has already had the global markets jittering. The euro fell to $1.11 against the US dollar following the election result, which is the lowest level it has fallen to in over a decade.

Although there is cause for concern, Cameron's response to Syriza's win displays an astounding level of chutzpah. He is warning about what the prospect of Greece defaulting and exiting the eurozone would do to Europe's economy, when his 2017 EU referendum would undoubtedly cause financial damage via a drop in investor confidence and business investment. Business leaders claim that his promise of a vote on Britain's EU membership has already caused worrying uncertainty.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.