Show Hide image

New Statesman appoints Stephen Bush as Staggers editor

The NS has hired Stephen Bush, of the Telegraph, to edit its online politics coverage.

 

The New Statesman has hired Stephen Bush as editor of The Staggers.

The move means that Stephen will be in charge of commissioning and editing the New Statesman's online politics coverage, and writing for the popular Staggers blog. He joins from the Telegraph, where he has written the Morning Briefing email since April. Before that, he wrote an online column for Progress, where he is a contributing editor.

The Staggers blog launched in 2009, and George Eaton became editor in March 2012. He left the position earlier this year when he was promoted to become NS political editor. Anoosh Chakelian, who was acting Staggers editor, has now been promoted to Deputy Web Editor.

Helen Lewis, editor of the New Statesman website, says: "Since joining the Telegraph, Stephen has quickly established himself as an intelligent, authoritative commentator on British politics. He writes like an angel and tweets like a demon - the perfect combination. With George, Anoosh and Stephen - plus Harry Lambert at May2015.com and contributing writer Tim Wigmore - the NS website heads into election year with a well-rounded, energetic and talented team. With web editor Caroline Crampton and CityMetric's Jonn Elledge and Barbara Speed also feeding into our politics coverage, we have an embarrassment of riches."

Jason Cowley, editor of the New Statesman, adds: "The New Statesman has a reputation for finding and showcasing fresh talent - just look at the careers of Mehdi Hasan, George Eaton, Rafael Behr, Helen Lewis and Laurie Penny. I'm convinced Stephen will develop into an exceptional talent."

Stephen Bush says: "I'm thrilled to be joining such a great team - if a little daunted at the size of the shoes I'm filling. I'm looking forward to entrenching and expanding the Staggers and the New Statesman's reputation for news, insight and quality."

Stephen will take up the position in the New Year, and his contact details will be announced in due course. You can follow him on Twitter: @stephenkb

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496