The FCA has fined five of the world's biggest banks. Photo: Flickr/Images Money
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Use today's record banking fine to put payday lenders out of business

Jumping the shark.

Today’s record £1.1bn fine imposed by the Financial Conduct Authority on five of the world’s biggest banks should not just disappear into the FCA’s coffers. George Osborne was quick out of the blocks this morning at 6am with a statement welcoming the record FCA fines on our banks over the foreign exchange rigging scandal. Unscrupulous bankers had tried to rig ‘the fix’, as it’s known, to pocket extra cash. Not good for London’s reputation, not least given Libor has already been tarnished.

Of the £1.5bn in fines, Osborne said: “I will ensure that these fines are used for the wider public good”. Given that some of those will be paid by the taxpayer owned RBS, there’s an element of us fining ourselves and then redistributing the cash elsewhere. The fine, imposed for the systematic rigging of the £3.5tn a day foreign exchange markets, should instead go to tackling another problem the FCA is grappling with: the high cost short-term credit market.  For earlier this week, the FCA also announced the new payday lending cap, with loan rates to be capped at 0.8 per cent per day of the amount borrowed. However, not only are there legitimate concerns that the rate remains too high, the move does nothing to spur the growth of alternative affordable providers people desperately need.  Given worries that the cap could lead to a significant shrinkage in the payday loan market with people resorting to illegal lenders, building an alternative network of providers is even more urgent.

We therefore believe that today’s £1.1bn should be used to capitalise and expand a network of such providers. Earlier this year, IPPR’s report, Jumping the shark set out a strategy for doing exactly that. We argued that regulation can reduce the damage done by providers of high cost consumer credit, but it is more effective at preventing harm than promoting good.  Alongside a tougher regulatory system, the UK also needs new forms of local, democratic finance that serve the needs of low- and middle-income households in the short term credit market, that otherwise risk being excluded.

To develop this network, we are calling for a new national institution – an Affordable Credit Trust - to be established with the remit of mobilising and capitalising a diverse range of local not-for -profit lenders. Affordable credit providers could draw down capital from the Trust and access technological infrastructure necessary to keep costs low, in exchange for offering affordable loans and operating in a democratic fashion, with borrowers becoming members of the institution. They could range from credit unions, housing associations to social enterprise providers and more, with the Trust encouraging innovation in how to service affordable, easy to use loans.  Moreover, providers should partner with institutions like local Post Offices or churches to ensure they operate at the heart of their community. 

To keep the system sustainable, lenders would be able to use as a last resort a repayment backstop mechanism similar to that employed with the DWP’s Budgeting Loan system, which consistently achieved over a 90 per cent repayment rate without placing the debtor in undue difficult.  We estimate that this in place, and with the right support, loans could be offered for as little as £3 for every £100 borrowed per month, compared to nearly £30 for the average payday loan.  In a time when household incomes continue to be squeezed, that difference can make all the difference.

However, we also know from past experience that the affordable credit market won’t grow on good wishes alone; it needs financial and technical support to get off the ground and compete with the payday lenders.  This is how it has grown in places like America, where one in three are members of a credit union.  If today’s fine by the FCA was used to capitalise an Affordable Credit Trust it could have the means to really turn the tide against high cost lenders, potentially offering up to 5 million affordable, manageable loans a year once the Trust and local provider networks are fully established, based on our previous research.

An Affordable Credit Trust capitalising affordable, democratic forms of finance captures the spirit of the times: it is about shifting capital and power away from the consumer credit industry and towards people and communities, giving them the means to build affordable alternatives to high cost credit.  It means shifting away from a reliance on cash transfers from the central state and towards rooting democratic forms of capital that allow people to be more assertive in standing up to markets where they dominate.  So on a day when the banks have been shown – yet again – to have little regard for the rules the rest of us have to live by, their fine should be used to help ensure those that need access to affordable credit are no longer alone. The £1.1bn fine should be used to help us jump the shark.

Mathew Lawrence is Research Fellow at IPPR. He tweets @DantonsHead

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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