The Returning Officer: Derbyshire NE II

In 1916, having decided to retire from politics, Colonel George Harland Bowden MP changed his mind at the adoption meeting of his agreed successor, Edward Cavendish, the Marquess of Hartington, alleging that the chair of the committee, Dr Josiah Court, had made remarks about his command of the Royal Fusiliers. Court had been the losing Conservative candidate in the five previous general elections, the earliest of which was in 1895.

In 1918, Harland Bowden stood as an Independent Unionist, splitting the vote, allowing the Liberal Joseph Stanley Holmes to win, with Hartington at the bottom
of the poll.

This article first appeared in the 22 October 2014 issue of the New Statesman, Why Britain and Germany aren't natural enemies

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.