Anas Sarwar campaigns during the Scottish independence referendum campaign. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Anas Sarwar resigns as Scottish Labour deputy leader

The shadow cabinet is likely his next stop.

Anas Sarwar's decision to stand down as Scottish Labour's deputy leader, which he announced at the party's gala dinner tonight, does not come as a surprise. There is a common recognition across the party that it needs fresh figures at the top and that they must be MSPs (Sarwar represents the Westminster seat of Glasgow Central).

The next Scottish Labour leader (almost certainly Jim Murphy) will now be free to take office with a new deputy. The contest for the latter will run alongside that for the former, with the winners announced on 13 December. Shadow education secretary Kezia Dugdale, who some urged to run for the leadership, Jenny Marra and James Kelly (who co-chair Murphy's leadership campaign) are regarded as the frontrunners for the post. 

Sarwar told the Daily Record"After thinking about it long and hard over the last few days I have decided that I believe Scottish Labour should be represented by a leadership team that is focused on the Scottish Parliament. It has been a privilege to serve as deputy leader for the last three years and a honour I never thought I would receive.

"But I think the leadership contest that is going on now is a time for everybody to reflect on what is best for Scottish Labour. And after much soul searching I have come to the conclusion that I believe the Scottish Labour leadership team should be focused on Holyrood.

"I have spoken to Ed Miliband and informed him of this decision and told him I want to devote my efforts to securing a Labour victory at next year’s general election and help make Ed Miliband Prime Minister."

But Sarwar is unlikely to fade into the shadows. Having relinquished his position, there is a strong chance that he will enter the shadow cabinet as part of the reshuffle that will be triggered by Murphy's decision to stand for leader. One move suggested by several Labour sources is for shadow Scottish secretary Margaret Curran to replace Murphy as shadow international development secretary, with Sarwar taking on her brief. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.