David Cameron says he wouldn't resign if Scotland votes Yes. Photo: Getty
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David Cameron says he won't resign if Scotland votes for independence

As polls narrow, and a Yes vote in the Scottish referendum becomes increasingly possible, the PM insists he won't resign if the Union breaks up.

The polls are narrowing with the Scottish referendum just a couple of weeks away. Alex Salmond's dream of an independent Scotland is in sight. And David Cameron, responding to the shift in the campaign's dynamic, has insisted he won't be resigning if Scotland goes independent.

When asked whether he would resign, he told the BBC's Today programme this morning:

I think it's very important to say no to that emphatically for this reason: that what is at stake is not this prime minister or that prime minister, or this party leader or that party leader. What is at stake is the future of Scotland … I think it is very important for people in Scotland to realise the consequence of their vote is purely and simply about Scotland and its place in the United Kingdom.

We shouldn't try and tie up in this vote the future of Alex Salmond or me.

Listen to the interview here:

It could be that the PM will have no choice but to stand down, in the case of a Yes vote. In the scenario of a break-up of the Union, a no confidence vote is likely to be called in Westminster.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.