Boris Johnson made remarks about Israel on LBC this morning. Photo: Getty
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"Disproportionate, ugly and tragic": Boris Johnson on Gaza eclipses the PM

A government minister resigned this morning over Gaza. No 10, the Chancellor and the Mayor of London have all responded to this move, revealing an increasingly untenable situation for the PM.

The minister and Tory peer Sayeeda Warsi resigned from the government this morning in protest over its policy on Gaza. The responses are interesting:

No 10

This is Downing Street's official response to Warsi's resignation:

The Prime Minister regrets that Baroness Warsi has decided to stand down and is grateful for the excellent work that she has done both as a Minister and in Opposition.

Our policy has always been consistently clear – the situation in Gaza is intolerable and we’ve urged both sides to agree to an immediate and unconditional ceasefire.

It's notable but unsurprising that there is no change in the PM's line on Gaza, his reticence over condemning Israel wholesale is still clear.
 

The Chancellor

The Telegraph reports George Osborne's far stronger reaction to the former Foreign Office minister's move:

This is a disappointing and frankly unnecessary decision. The British government is working with others in the world to bring peace to Gaza and we now have a tentative ceasefire which we all hope will hold.

The Mayor of London

Boris Johnson called the news "very sad" and voiced a hope for her return to government "as soon as possible". Yet it's his reaction to the crisis in Gaza, on LBC this morning, that is telling in how it differs from David Cameron's stance:

I can’t for the life of me see how this can be a sensible strategy. I think it is disproportionate, I think it is ugly and it is tragic and I don’t think it will do Israel any good in the long run.


Cameron so far has avoided the word "disproportionate". With a dramatic government resignation and a popular Tory figure like Johnson, a self-proclaimed Zionist, strongly condemning Israel's actions, how long will the PM be able to hold (or hold back) his position?

UPDATE 5 August 12.56

Ed Miliband has added to the responses to Warsi's resignation, calling her statement "completely right":

The government's position is wrong and I think Sayeeda Warsi's statement is completely right about this.

Miliband also called for the PM to "think much more clearly" about his policy on Gaza and to "break his silence" on the subject of Israel's actions.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.

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Jeremy Corbyn fans are getting extremely angry at the wrong Michael Foster

He didn't try to block the Labour leader off a ballot. He's just against hunting with dogs. 

Michael Foster was a Labour MP for Worcester from 1997 to 2010, where he was best known for trying to ban hunting with dogs. After losing his seat to Tory Robin Walker, he settled back into private life.

He quietly worked for a charity, and then a trade association. That is, until his doppelganger tried to get Jeremy Corbyn struck off the ballot paper. 

The Labour donor Michael Foster challenged Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Corbyn automatically run for leadership in court. He lost his bid, and Corbyn supporters celebrated.

And some of the most jubilant decided to tell Foster where to go. 

Foster told The Staggers he had received aggressive tweets: "I have had my photograph in the online edition of The Sun with the story. I had to ring them up and suggest they take it down. It is quite a common name."

Indeed, Michael Foster is such a common name that there were two Labour MPs with that name between 1997 and 2010. The other was Michael Jabez Foster, MP for Hastings and Rye. 

One senior Labour MP rang the Worcester Michael Foster up this week, believing he was the donor. 

Foster explained: "When I said I wasn't him, then he began to talk about the time he spent in Hastings with me which was the other Michael Foster."

Having two Michael Fosters in Parliament at the same time (the donor Michael Foster was never an MP) could sometimes prove useful. 

Foster said: "When I took the bill forward to ban hunting, he used to get quite a few of my death threats.

"Once I paid his pension - it came out of my salary."

Foster has never met the donor Michael Foster. An Owen Smith supporter, he admits "part of me" would have been pleased if he had managed to block Corbyn from the ballot paper, but believes it could have caused problems down the line.

He does however have a warning for Corbyn supporters: "If Jeremy wins, a place like Worcester will never have a Labour MP.

"I say that having years of working in the constituency. And Worcester has to be won by Labour as part of that tranche of seats to enable it to form a government."