Moeen Ali wielding the bat for England in Bangladesh earlier this year. Photo: Getty Images
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Could cricketer Moeen Ali be the saviour of multiculturalism in Britain?

Moeen Ali has shown it is possible to be both a devoutly practising Muslim and a ‎loyal participating citizen of Britain. There is no contradiction at all between the two.

To the nation’s cricket fans it was a long-awaited moment of overwhelming relief. England’s victory over India last week was the first time they had won in 11 Test matches.

‎The significance of the result, though, may extend far beyond a mere cricket pitch. The man who bowled the team to victory on the last day of the match, Moeen Ali, is a devout Muslim who sports the type of magnificent and lustrous beard not seen flowing over an England shirt since the days of W G Grace. He could well be the saviour of multiculturalism in Britain.

‎There should not be a problem with multiculturalism, but it has been allowed to suffer a rather bad press in recent years. ‎It is now rarely mentioned in the right-wing media without the qualification that it has become a “failed” and “discredited” doctrine, one that was apparently imposed upon an unwilling British public with the effect of eroding indigenous values and customs in favour of foreign ones.

‎Its intentions, of course, ‎are nothing of the sort. It is simply a recognition that immigrants and their descendants can observe their own traditions – whether religious or cultural – while still being model citizens of the UK. And it holds that the institutions of British public life should protect and promote a plurality of cultures in an environment of liberal tolerance.

‎Somewhere along the line, however, the impression has arisen that this doctrine has overstepped its boundaries. That it is now undermining, and even threatening to destroy, whatever overarching sense of Britishness there remains to bind us. Nowhere is this more resonant than in the debate about the integration of Britain’s Muslim community. Regular headlines about radicalised youths, terrorist plots and “Trojan horse” schemes to Islamify state schools have given succour to those who believe a generation of politicians damaged the very fabric of this country through their desire not to offend or insult even those minority elements who detest Britain.

So step forward Moeen Ali. Wearing a beard that he describes as a “label” of his faith, England’s latest cricketing hero could barely look any more Muslim. He even managed to take to the field against India last week wearing “Save Gaza” and “Free Palestine” wristbands.

More importantly, he has scored important runs and taken crucial wickets while displaying a huge and evident pride in wearing the Three Lions of England. He has shown it is possible to be both a devoutly practising Muslim and a ‎loyal participating citizen of Britain. There is no contradiction at all between the two.

And that is the whole point of multiculturalism. Moeen Ali is not only its living embodiment but also – through his conspicuously Islamic appearance and thoughtful demeanour – its ultimate PR man.

His message is not only one for opponents of multiculturalism in “mainstream” British society but also sceptics in his own community. Those who doubt the importance of the latter need only look at the rhetoric of the figures exposed by the apparent “problems” in Muslim Britain – the views of the radicals waging jihad or the extremists trying to take over state schools in Birmingham or women proudly declaring they are “liberated” by wearing the face veil.

Their overriding message is that Britain is debased and impure, and no fit home for a Muslim. They believe that Britain itself must be changed – along sharia lines – before they can live decent Islamic lives in this country.

Of course these people only represent a fringe ‎element in what is a very broad and diverse religious community. But their message is constantly aired and heard, and it is one that can influence impressionable young Muslims while antagonising those of other cultures.

Moeen Ali shows a different path. His rise to prominence could not be more timely, and his example is one that needs to be publicised and promoted as widely as possible.

There is often a significant obstacle in such cases in the personality of the sportsman or woman concerned, as many are reluctant to espouse any cause other than their own athletic prowess. A glance at Moeen Ali’s recent interviews, however, reveal that he is cut from a rather different cloth. In fact, he positively embraces this calling.

“Islam does not have the best reputation at times but if I can help change maybe 1 per cent of negative perception, that would make me very happy,” he declared earlier this year.

He added: “It gives me inspiration to feel that I am representing a large community and I do see myself as a role model. People ask me if I see it as a mission and I do.” While more sensitive souls may have felt offended, he did not raise any objection when his county, Worcestershire, branded him ‘the beard that’s feared’ as a marketing slogan.

Those who work in Westminster would do well to emulate his purpose and resolve. Dispiriting though it may have been, it was perhaps no surprise when David Cameron claimed in 2011 that the “doctrine of state multiculturalism” has “encouraged different cultures to live separate lives, apart from each other and the mainstream”. Even more worrying has been the apparent willingness of Labour frontbenchers to disown aspects of their party’s proud record in promoting racial tolerance and harmony.

In reality, all serious politicians of whatever persuasion know that multiculturalism is the only game in town for a country of Britain’s history and ethnic composition. There is no credibility in alternative ideologies that would seek to suppress viable and inoffensive traditions that originate from other shores. No one wants to go back to the dark days of previous decades when far too many people were made to feel embarrassed and also terrified to belong to an ethnic minority group.

But even the most blinkered supporters of multiculturalism would admit that mistakes have been made in the past – that intolerant practices and ideas have been accepted in the name of tolerance. It may also have been forgotten that in certain cases – such as forced marriage or female genital mutilation – it is the duty of the state to protect the rights and conscience of the individual over the traditions of a foreign community.

The focus should be on how to make multiculturalism work better, not on how quickly to abandon it. It is a message that can be spread with a little help from a quiet but driven chap from Birmingham.

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Air pollution: 5 steps to vanquishing an invisible killer

A new report looks at the economics of air pollution. 

110, 150, 520... These chilling statistics are the number of deaths attributable to particulate air pollution for the cities of Southampton, Nottingham and Birmingham in 2010 respectively. Or how about 40,000 - that is the total number of UK deaths per year that are attributable the combined effects of particulate matter (PM2.5) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx).

This situation sucks, to say the very least. But while there are no dramatic images to stir up action, these deaths are preventable and we know their cause. Road traffic is the worst culprit. Traffic is responsible for 80 per cent of NOx on high pollution roads, with diesel engines contributing the bulk of the problem.

Now a new report by ResPublica has compiled a list of ways that city councils around the UK can help. The report argues that: “The onus is on cities to create plans that can meet the health and economic challenge within a short time-frame, and identify what they need from national government to do so.”

This is a diplomatic way of saying that current government action on the subject does not go far enough – and that cities must help prod them into gear. That includes poking holes in the government’s proposed plans for new “Clean Air Zones”.

Here are just five of the ways the report suggests letting the light in and the pollution out:

1. Clean up the draft Clean Air Zones framework

Last October, the government set out its draft plans for new Clean Air Zones in the UK’s five most polluted cities, Birmingham, Derby, Leeds, Nottingham and Southampton (excluding London - where other plans are afoot). These zones will charge “polluting” vehicles to enter and can be implemented with varying levels of intensity, with three options that include cars and one that does not.

But the report argues that there is still too much potential for polluters to play dirty with the rules. Car-charging zones must be mandatory for all cities that breach the current EU standards, the report argues (not just the suggested five). Otherwise national operators who own fleets of vehicles could simply relocate outdated buses or taxis to places where they don’t have to pay.  

Different vehicles should fall under the same rules, the report added. Otherwise, taking your car rather than the bus could suddenly seem like the cost-saving option.

2. Vouchers to vouch-safe the project’s success

The government is exploring a scrappage scheme for diesel cars, to help get the worst and oldest polluting vehicles off the road. But as the report points out, blanket scrappage could simply put a whole load of new fossil-fuel cars on the road.

Instead, ResPublica suggests using the revenue from the Clean Air Zone charges, plus hiked vehicle registration fees, to create “Pollution Reduction Vouchers”.

Low-income households with older cars, that would be liable to charging, could then use the vouchers to help secure alternative transport, buy a new and compliant car, or retrofit their existing vehicle with new technology.

3. Extend Vehicle Excise Duty

Vehicle Excise Duty is currently only tiered by how much CO2 pollution a car creates for the first year. After that it becomes a flat rate for all cars under £40,000. The report suggests changing this so that the most polluting vehicles for CO2, NOx and PM2.5 continue to pay higher rates throughout their life span.

For ClientEarth CEO James Thornton, changes to vehicle excise duty are key to moving people onto cleaner modes of transport: “We need a network of clean air zones to keep the most polluting diesel vehicles from the most polluted parts of our towns and cities and incentives such as a targeted scrappage scheme and changes to vehicle excise duty to move people onto cleaner modes of transport.”

4. Repurposed car parks

You would think city bosses would want less cars in the centre of town. But while less cars is good news for oxygen-breathers, it is bad news for city budgets reliant on parking charges. But using car parks to tap into new revenue from property development and joint ventures could help cities reverse this thinking.

5. Prioritise public awareness

Charge zones can be understandably unpopular. In 2008, a referendum in Manchester defeated the idea of congestion charging. So a big effort is needed to raise public awareness of the health crisis our roads have caused. Metro mayors should outline pollution plans in their manifestos, the report suggests. And cities can take advantage of their existing assets. For example in London there are plans to use electronics in the Underground to update travellers on the air pollution levels.

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Change is already in the air. Southampton has used money from the Local Sustainable Travel Fund to run a successful messaging campaign. And in 2011 Nottingham City Council became the first city to implement a Workplace Parking levy – a scheme which has raised £35.3m to help extend its tram system, upgrade the station and purchase electric buses.

But many more “air necessities” are needed before we can forget about pollution’s worry and its strife.  

 

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.