A man stabbed at Notting Hill Carnival in 2011. Photo: Getty.
Show Hide image

Teens fleeing warzones are fuelling violent crime in London, youth crime summit warned

The risk posed by traumatised asylum seekers was one of many themes identified at Labour's Youth Crime Summit in London today. 

Teenage refugees and asylum seekers fleeing warzones are fuelling violent crime across London, a youth crime summit hosted by Labour was warned today.

Gary Kelly, Detective Superintendent in Southwark, said: “The trauma of youngsters fleeing war-torn countries and coming here – I can’t overestimate the challenges that Syria and Libya will cause us across London.”

He identified youths aged between 13 and 16 as being at risk of adopting violent gang culture and falling into criminal activity. While they tend not to be affiliated with formal gangs – “they are much more chaotic” – Kelly explained “they are responsible for a wide range of violent crime, including robbery and burglary”.

He advised participants, including co-ordinators of gang diversion schemes, NGO workers and councillors, that the key to tackling gangs in the capital is disrupting their drug supply chains, which span as far afield as the south and south west coasts of the UK. “We need cross-border working, good governance and oversight to reduce that threat,” he said.

He added that he was concerned “young females are becoming involved in the supply chain and are at increased risk of sexual exploitation.”

Steve Reed, Labour MP for Croydon North and shadow Home Office Minister, called for strong partnerships between local councils, police, probation services, but with “the community in the driving seat”. Gang violence and culture is “one of the most difficult problems” facing urban society, he said.

He harked back to his experience as head of Lambeth Council, which devolved control of youth crime services to a youth-steered trust, into which £3m was invested: “It was much more effective."

Reed said Labour wants to communicate with and reach out to frontline workers tackling youth and gang crime, in order to inform policy proposals that will be included in the party’s manifesto.

He told the assembled participants: “We need to turn politics on its head. Labour understands that. We want to share power if elected.”

The party will host up to five summits around the country over the summer as part of a “new, iterative process” of policy formation, before unveiling proposals for dealing with youth crime in the autumn.

Better job opportunities and training for young people was identified as integral to dissuading young men from dealing drugs and choosing a life of crime.

Eighteen-year-old Temi Mwale, founder of gang culture diversion scheme Get Outta The Gang, demanded more resources and effort be invested in long-term diversion workshop programmes to help angry young men break free from violent mindsets.

She summed up her motivation for establishing her youth group in a single sentence: “One of my childhood friends was shot", but continued: “Everybody has tragedies. It’s about moving forward.” 

Mwale later explained to Reed that the young people with whom she works feel disaffected by politics and mistrustful of politicians: “There’s this whole resentment. They have this blanket approach: ‘They [politicians] are all against us’.”

London is a tale of two cities, she told the Labour MP, making clear that there is a vast chasm between life for middle-class professionals and and life on an estate. “If you went out and got stabbed, that would be something very out of the ordinary for you. But there are young people going out of the house every day who expect to die.”

Lucy Fisher writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2013. She tweets @LOS_Fisher.

 

Getty
Show Hide image

Donald Trump is the Republican nominee. What now?

So a Clinton-Trump general election is assured – a historically unpopular match-up based on their current favourability ratings.

That’s it. Ted Cruz bowed out of the Republican presidential race last night, effectively handing the nomination to Donald Trump. “From the beginning I’ve said that I would continue on as long as there was a viable path to victory,” Cruz said. “Tonight, I’m sorry to say it appears that path has been foreclosed.”

What foreclosed his path was his sizeable loss to Trump in Indiana. Cruz had bet it all on the Hoosier State, hoping to repeat his previous Midwest victories in Iowa and Wisconsin. He formed a pact with John Kasich, whereby Kasich left the anti-Trump field clear for Cruz in Indiana in return for Cruz not campaigning in Oregon and New Mexico. He announced Carly Fiorina as his vice-presidential nominee last week, hoping the news would give him a late boost.

It didn’t work. Donald Trump won Indiana handily, with 53% of the vote to Cruz’s 37%. Trump won all of the state’s nine congressional districts, and so collected all 57 of the convention delegates on offer. He now has 1,014 delegates bound to him on the convention’s first ballot, plus 34 unbound delegates who’ve said they’ll vote for him (according to Daniel Nichanian’s count).

That leaves Trump needing just 189 more to hit the 1,237 required for the nomination – a number he was very likely to hit in the remaining contests before Cruz dropped out (it’s just 42% of the 445 available), and that he is now certain to achieve. No need to woo more unbound delegates. No contested convention. No scrambling for votes on the second ballot. 

Though Bernie Sanders narrowly won the Democratic primary in Indiana, he’s still 286 pledged delegates short of Hillary Clinton. He isn’t going to win the 65% of remaining delegates he’d need to catch up. Clinton now needs just 183 more delegates to reach the required 2,383. Like Trump, she is certain to reach that target on 7th June when a number of states vote, including the largest: California.

So a Clinton-Trump general election is assured – a historically unpopular match-up based on their current favourability ratings. But while Clinton is viewed favourably by 42% of voters and unfavourably by 55%, Trump is viewed favourably by just 35% and unfavourably by a whopping 61%. In head-to-head polling (which isn’t particularly predictive this far from election day), Clinton leads with 47% to Trump’s 40%. Betting markets make Clinton the heavy favourite, with a 70% chance of winning the presidency in November.

Still, a few questions that remain as we head into the final primaries and towards the party conventions in July: how many Republican officeholders will reluctantly endorse Trump, how many will actively distance themselves from him, and how many will try to remain silent? Will a conservative run as an independent candidate against Trump in the general election? Can Trump really “do presidential” for the next six months, as he boasted recently, and improve on his deep unpopularity?

And on the Democratic side: will Sanders concede gracefully and offer as full-throated an endorsement of Clinton as she did of Barack Obama eight years ago? It was on 7th June 2008 that she told her supporters: “The way to continue our fight now, to accomplish the goals for which we stand is to take our energy, our passion, our strength, and do all we can to help elect Barack Obama, the next president of the United States.” Will we hear something similar from Sanders next month? 

Jonathan Jones writes for the New Statesman on American politics.