Construction of a residential housing estate, Grantham, Lincolnshire (Getty)
Show Hide image

Regeneration, revenue and rethinking: the future of housing

Want to see what ‘real’ social housing looks like? Take a look at a short film that the New Statesman made and fill out our housing poll.

The New Statesman in partnership with Home Group will be hosting three fringe events at this year’s party conferences. The big panel debates will be between housing experts and key note speakers Roberta Blackman-Woods MP, Shadow Minister, Communities and Local Government, a Minister from the Department of Communities and Local Government, Conservative (TBC) and Stephen Gilbert MP, Liberal Democrats.

For the chance to win a six month subscription to the New Statesman magazine, please answer four simple questions in a New Statesman poll on social housing below and email with your contact details. Three lucky readers will be contacted after the 12th September 2014.

The poll results will be presented to the MP speaker at the fringe events and available on

We are also now taking your questions for our fringe panellists via email on or on twitter @nsliveevents @homegroup#RethinkingHousing, so get involved!

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world's leading questionnaire tool.

Take a look at a short film that the New Statesman made with Home Group residents and Chief Executive, Mark Henderson at Rayners lane, a £140m regeneration project in the London Borough of Harrow.


Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Why relations between Theresa May and Philip Hammond became tense so quickly

The political imperative of controlling immigration is clashing with the economic imperative of maintaining growth. 

There is no relationship in government more important than that between the prime minister and the chancellor. When Theresa May entered No.10, she chose Philip Hammond, a dependable technocrat and long-standing ally who she had known since Oxford University. 

But relations between the pair have proved far tenser than anticipated. On Wednesday, Hammond suggested that students could be excluded from the net migration target. "We are having conversations within government about the most appropriate way to record and address net migration," he told the Treasury select committee. The Chancellor, in common with many others, has long regarded the inclusion of students as an obstacle to growth. 

The following day Hammond was publicly rebuked by No.10. "Our position on who is included in the figures has not changed, and we are categorically not reviewing whether or not students are included," a spokesman said (as I reported in advance, May believes that the public would see this move as "a fix"). 

This is not the only clash in May's first 100 days. Hammond was aggrieved by the Prime Minister's criticisms of loose monetary policy (which forced No.10 to state that it "respects the independence of the Bank of England") and is resisting tougher controls on foreign takeovers. The Chancellor has also struck a more sceptical tone on the UK's economic prospects. "It is clear to me that the British people did not vote on June 23 to become poorer," he declared in his conference speech, a signal that national prosperity must come before control of immigration. 

May and Hammond's relationship was never going to match the remarkable bond between David Cameron and George Osborne. But should relations worsen it risks becoming closer to that beween Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling. Like Hammond, Darling entered the Treasury as a calm technocrat and an ally of the PM. But the extraordinary circumstances of the financial crisis transformed him into a far more assertive figure.

In times of turmoil, there is an inevitable clash between political and economic priorities. As prime minister, Brown resisted talk of cuts for fear of the electoral consequences. But as chancellor, Darling was more concerned with the bottom line (backing a rise in VAT). By analogy, May is focused on the political imperative of controlling immigration, while Hammond is focused on the economic imperative of maintaining growth. If their relationship is to endure far tougher times they will soon need to find a middle way. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.