298 passengers and crew died in Thursday's crash. Photo: Getty.
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The MH17 crash has hardened public opinion towards Russia

Last Thursday's MH17 crash has changed perceptions of the Russian-Ukrainian conflict. Most voters now think the issue is a matter for the West, and support three specific policies.

The British public has hardened its attitude towards Russia in the wake of the MH17 crash.

YouGov polling conducted last weekend has shown that nearly two-thirds of voters now think the Russia-Ukrainian conflict is something that should concern Britain and the West.

When asked the question in mid-March, fewer than half thought the issue was a matter for the UK.

How should the matter concern us? Three actions now have the support of at least 50 per cent of voters.

• Imposing trade sanctions on Russia

• Freezing Russian assets in Western banks

• Expelling Russia from the G8

More voters voiced support than didn't for the first two policies in March, but a majority now do after the crash.

However the biggest change in public opinion has been for expelling Russia from the G8.

There was more opposition than support for the idea in March, but now 50 per cent support the policy, while just 20 per cent oppose it (for the number-counters, 30 per cent expressed no decisive opinion).

Harry Lambert was the editor of May2015, the New Statesman's election website.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.