David Cameron's first Cabinet in 2010. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

LIVE: Who's in and who's out - the full reshuffle list

Michael Gove down, Ken Clarke out, Nicky Morgan on the up: all the latest on the Cabinet reshuffle.

Throughout the day, we'll be keeping an updated list of all the latest appointments, demotions and sackings from the Cabinet reshuffle. Here's the latest:

 

Chancellor

George Osborne HOLD

As the economic recovery continues, Cameron has kept his No 2 in place to remain working on the “longterm economic plan”.

Home Secretary

Theresa May HOLD

Despite the recent passport office fiasco and the botched appointment of Baroness Butler-Sloss to head the child sex abuse inquiry, May has survived as the most senior women in the Government.

Foreign Secretary

Out: William Hague

Hague has been moved to Leader of the Commons, so will remain as one of David Cameron’s right hand men until he steps down from Parliament next year.

In: Philip Hammond

A known Eurosceptic who has voiced his view that Britain should leave the EU unless more powers are repatriated, Hammond will now be central to those negotiations in Brussels.

Defence Secretary

Out: Philip Hammond

In: Michael Fallon

Previously presiding over a diverse ministerial portfolio including energy, business enterprise and the city of Portsmouth, Fallon, known for his crisis-management skills, has been promoted to the Cabinet.

Education Secretary

Out: Michael Gove

Demoted to Chief Whip, Gove’s controversial education reforms made him unpopular with teachers and he was damaged by a recent high-profile spat with May; now to do more broadcast for the government.

In: Nicky Morgan

An acolyte of George Osborne in her former Financial Secretary to the Treasury role, Morgan’s was one of the top female promotions; she was also awarded equalities brief, a controversial choice given she voted against same sex marriage.

Defra Secretary

Out: Owen Paterson

The right-wing climate change sceptic has been demoted from the Cabinet, leading environmental groups to crow. His handling of the winter floods and badger culling exercise had been widely criticised.

In: Liz Truss

Described as a “human hand grenade” while Education Minister, feisty and ambitious Truss was the second women to be appointed Secretary of State today.

Chief Whip

Out: Sir George Young 

The 72-year-old is out of the Cabinet altogether; he is set to retire from Parliament at next May’s election after 41 years as an MP.

In: Michael Gove

Leader of the House

Out: Andrew Lansley

Demoted from the Government, Lansley has also lost out on the nomination to be Britain’s European Commissioner, a role for which he was widely touted – a bad day.

In: William Hague

Welsh Secretary

Out: David Jones

The Welsh-speaker and proud Welshman returns to the back benches after less than two years.

In: Stephen Crabb

Formerly Jones’ deputy, the MP for Preseli Pembrokeshire is the only man sporting a beard to enter the Cabinet.

Universities Minister

Out: David Willetts

Known as “Two brains”, Willetts immediately announced his intention to step down as an MP next year following his resignation last night.

In: Greg Clark

Clark added universities to his brief and will also continue as minister for cities and local growth.

Leader of the House of Lords

Out: Lord Hill

Cameron has selected the respected peer as Britain’s nominee for European Commissioner, avoiding sparking a by-election if he had chosen an MP.

In: Baroness Stowell

Last year the former No 10 aide to John Major steered the gay marriage Bill through the Lords, after which she was promoted to the role of communities and local government minister.

Attorney General

Out: Dominic Grieve

The Government’s most senior legal adviser since 2010 was demoted from the Cabinet; he has admitted he is “sad” to lose the role.

In: Jeremy Wright

Previously junior justice minister, Wright has kept a low profile: Sky’s Adam Boulton admitted today that he would struggle to pick Wright out in an identity parade.

Minister of State for Business, Enterprise and Energy

Out: Michael Fallon

In: Matthew Hancock (who will attend Cabinet, and be minister for Portsmouth)

Clearly forgiven for posing in front of “Sack Cameron” graffiti last week, he reportedly used to prep the Prime Minister before PMQs and is another of Osborne’s protégés to rise.

Minister of State for the Home Office and Ministry of Justice (police minister)

Out: Damian Green

Sacked last night, Green’s departure was described as “inexplicable” by political commentator Ian Dale, who noted him as a “good media performer and original thinker”.

In: Mike Penning

The former fireman has been promoted after being appointed disabilities minister last October.

Minister of State for Business and Education

Out: Matthew Hancock

In: Nick Boles (he will also have responsibility for equal marriage legislation)

Formerly Minister for Planning and Development, Boles will now preside over adult skills, apprenticeships and business support.

Minister of State for the Department of Work and Pensions (minister for disabled people)

Out: Mike Penning

In: Mark Harper

After resigning swiftly and honourably earlier this year when he discovered his cleaner was working in the UK illegally, Harper has been restored to a post in the Government.

Minister of State for the Cabinet Office

In: Jo Johnson

Previously heading up David Cameron’s policy unit and a junior Cabinet Office minister, Boris’s brother has been promoted to minister of state.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury

Out: Nicky Morgan

In: David Gauke

Previously the Exchequer Secretary, Gauke has been bumped up a notch in the Treasury.

Minister of State for Transport

In: John Hayes

Hayes will also carry on as a Cabinet Office minister, where his role was described as the Prime Minister’s envoy to the backbenches.

Lord Privy Seal

Out: Andrew Lansley

In: Oliver Letwin

A Cabinet Office minister for government policy, Letwin’s promotion today has been described as tokenistic.

Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury

Out: David Gauke

In: Priti Patel

The right-wing former PR executive joined the government and will now deal with tax policy.

Minister for Schools

Out: Liz Truss

In: Nick Gibb

Returning to his old post, Gibb will be “working with Nicky Morgan to ensure no let up in education reforms”, according to a tweet by Cameron.

Parliamentary Secretary

Out: Jo Johnson

In: Brooks Newmark (he will also be minister for civil society)

The Braintree MP has joined the Government. Formerly a whip between 2010 and 2012.

Minister for Communities

Out: Baroness Stowell

In: Brandon Lewis

Local government minister Lewis was promoted to Minister of State.

 

Other moves:

Ken Clarke, minister without portfolio, is out of the Cabinet entirely.

Nicky Morgan will hold her current position as minister for women alongside the education brief.

Also out are Nick Hurd, minister for civil society (replaced by Brooks Newmark); Alan Duncan, international development minister (replaced by Desmond Swayne, a former whip); Greg Barker, energy minister.

Lord Hill is nominated for European Commissioner.

Esther McVey, employment minister (number two in the Department of Work and Pensions) will stay there, but attend Cabinet meetings.

Anna Soubry moves up to minister of state at Defence.

Penny Mordaunt is a parliamentary under secretary at Communities and is responsible for coastal communities.

Amber Rudd becomes a parliamentary under secretary at the department of energy and climate change. 

Claire Perry becomes a parliamentary under secretary at transport with responsibility for rail.

Robert Buckland is the new solicitor-general.

Julian Brazier becomes a junior defence minister.

George Freeman becomes minister for life sciences.

Ed Vaizey becomes minister for digital industries.

Andrew Murrison moves from defence to join the Northern Ireland office as a junior minister.

Oliver Letwin remains as minister for government policy and becomes Lord Privy Seal.

Alun Cairns becomes parliamentary under secretary for the Wales office and will be Government Whip.

Sam Gymiah becomes parliamentary under secretary at the Department for Education.

Mel Stride, Therese Coffey, Ben Wallace and Damian Hinds become Assistant Government Whips.

Over at the Spectator, Fraser Nelson is reporting that Liam Fox was offered a minister of state role at the Foreign Office, but declined it. Fox has now confirmed this.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is Scottish Labour on the way back, or heading for civil war?

There are signs of life, but also recriminations.

The extraordinary rise of the Scottish Tories and the collapse in SNP seat numbers grabbed most of the headlines in the recent general election. Less remarked on was the sudden, unexpected exhalation of air that came from what was thought to be the corpse of Scottish Labour.

In 2015, Labour lost 40 of its 41 Scottish seats as the SNP rocketed from six to 56, was wiped out in its Glaswegian heartlands, and looked to have ceded its place as the choice of centre-left voters – perhaps permanently – to the Nationalists. But while the electorate’s convulsion in June against the SNP’s insistence on a second independence referendum most benefited Ruth Davidson, it also served to reanimate Labour.

The six seats grabbed back (making a total of seven) included three in the West of Scotland, proving that the Nat stranglehold on Labour’s territory was not quite as secure as it had seemed. There is, it appears, life in the old dog yet.

Not only that, but the surprise success of Jeremy Corbyn across the UK has stiffened Labour’s spine when it comes to insisting that it, and not the SNP, is the rightful home of Scotland’s socialists.

Corbyn was largely kept south of the border during the election campaign – Kezia Dugdale, the leader at Holyrood, had supported Owen Smith’s leadership challenge. But in August, Corbyn will embark on a five-day tour of marginal SNP constituencies that Labour could potentially take back at the next election. The party has set a target of reclaiming 18 Scottish seats as part of the 64 it needs across Britain to win a majority at Westminster. The trip will focus on traditional areas such as Glasgow and Lanarkshire, where tiny swings would return seats to the People’s Party. Dugdale is no doubt hoping for some reflected glory.

Corbyn will present himself as the authentically left-wing choice, a leader who will increase public spending and invest in public services compared to the austerity of the Tories and the timidity of the SNP. “Labour remains on an election footing as a government-in-waiting, ready to end failed austerity and ensure that Scotland has the resources it needs to provide the public services its people deserve,” he said. “Unlike the SNP and the Tories, Labour will transform our economy through investment, insisting that the true wealth creators - that means all of us – benefit from it.”

The SNP has benefited in recent years from the feeling among many north of the border that Labour and the Tories were committed to differing shades of a similar economic programme, that was starving public services of cash and that paid little attention to Scottish desires or needs. But as the Nats’ spell in government in Edinburgh has worn on, first under Alex Salmond and now Nicola Sturgeon, with little being done to tackle the nation’s social problems, patience has started to run out.

Dugdale said yesterday that she “looked forward to joining Jeremy in August as we take our message to the people of Scotland”. That’s not a sentiment we would have heard from her before June. But it does raise the future spectacle of Davidson’s Tories battling for the centre and centre-right vote and Labour gunning for the left. The SNP, which has tried to be all things to all people, will have to make a choice – boasting that it is “Scotland’s Party” is unlikely to be enough.

The 20th anniversary of the referendum that delivered the Scottish Parliament is almost upon us. Then, Scottish Labour provided the UK and the Westminster government with figures of the stature of Gordon Brown, Robin Cook, Donald Dewar and George Robertson. That was a long time ago, and the decline in quality of Labour’s representatives both in London and Edinburgh since has been marked. The SNP’s decade of success has attracted much of the brightest new talent through its doors. Young Scots still seem to be set on the idea of independence. Labour has a credibility problem that won’t be easily shaken off.

But still, the body has twitched – perhaps it’s even sitting up. Is Scottish Labour on the way back? If so, is that down to the SNP’s declining popularity or to Corbyn’s appeal? And could Dugdale be a convincing frontwoman for a genuinely left-wing agenda?

There may be trouble ahead. Yesterday, the Scottish Labour Campaign for Socialism – whose convener, Neil Findlay MSP, ran Corbyn’s leadership campaign in Scotland – accused Dugdale of “holding Corbyn back” in June. A spokesperson for the group said: “While it’s great we won some seats back, it’s clear that the campaign here failed to deliver. While elsewhere we've seen people being enthused by ‘for the many, not the few’ we concentrated on the dispiriting visionless ‘send Nicola a message’ – and paid a price for that, coming third in votes and seats for the first time in a century. In Scotland we looked more like [former Scottish leader] Jim Murphy’s Labour Party than Jeremy Corbyn’s – and that isn’t a good look.”

While the group insists this isn’t intended as a challenge to Dugdale, that might change if Corbyn receives a rapturous reception in August. We’ll learn then whether Scotland is falling for the high-tax, high-spending pitch that seems to be working so well elsewhere, and whether Scottish Labour has jerked back to life only to find itself staring down the barrel of a civil war.

Chris Deerin is the New Statesman's contributing editor (Scotland).