David Cameron's first Cabinet in 2010. Photo: Getty
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LIVE: Who's in and who's out - the full reshuffle list

Michael Gove down, Ken Clarke out, Nicky Morgan on the up: all the latest on the Cabinet reshuffle.

Throughout the day, we'll be keeping an updated list of all the latest appointments, demotions and sackings from the Cabinet reshuffle. Here's the latest:

 

Chancellor

George Osborne HOLD

As the economic recovery continues, Cameron has kept his No 2 in place to remain working on the “longterm economic plan”.

Home Secretary

Theresa May HOLD

Despite the recent passport office fiasco and the botched appointment of Baroness Butler-Sloss to head the child sex abuse inquiry, May has survived as the most senior women in the Government.

Foreign Secretary

Out: William Hague

Hague has been moved to Leader of the Commons, so will remain as one of David Cameron’s right hand men until he steps down from Parliament next year.

In: Philip Hammond

A known Eurosceptic who has voiced his view that Britain should leave the EU unless more powers are repatriated, Hammond will now be central to those negotiations in Brussels.

Defence Secretary

Out: Philip Hammond

In: Michael Fallon

Previously presiding over a diverse ministerial portfolio including energy, business enterprise and the city of Portsmouth, Fallon, known for his crisis-management skills, has been promoted to the Cabinet.

Education Secretary

Out: Michael Gove

Demoted to Chief Whip, Gove’s controversial education reforms made him unpopular with teachers and he was damaged by a recent high-profile spat with May; now to do more broadcast for the government.

In: Nicky Morgan

An acolyte of George Osborne in her former Financial Secretary to the Treasury role, Morgan’s was one of the top female promotions; she was also awarded equalities brief, a controversial choice given she voted against same sex marriage.

Defra Secretary

Out: Owen Paterson

The right-wing climate change sceptic has been demoted from the Cabinet, leading environmental groups to crow. His handling of the winter floods and badger culling exercise had been widely criticised.

In: Liz Truss

Described as a “human hand grenade” while Education Minister, feisty and ambitious Truss was the second women to be appointed Secretary of State today.

Chief Whip

Out: Sir George Young 

The 72-year-old is out of the Cabinet altogether; he is set to retire from Parliament at next May’s election after 41 years as an MP.

In: Michael Gove

Leader of the House

Out: Andrew Lansley

Demoted from the Government, Lansley has also lost out on the nomination to be Britain’s European Commissioner, a role for which he was widely touted – a bad day.

In: William Hague

Welsh Secretary

Out: David Jones

The Welsh-speaker and proud Welshman returns to the back benches after less than two years.

In: Stephen Crabb

Formerly Jones’ deputy, the MP for Preseli Pembrokeshire is the only man sporting a beard to enter the Cabinet.

Universities Minister

Out: David Willetts

Known as “Two brains”, Willetts immediately announced his intention to step down as an MP next year following his resignation last night.

In: Greg Clark

Clark added universities to his brief and will also continue as minister for cities and local growth.

Leader of the House of Lords

Out: Lord Hill

Cameron has selected the respected peer as Britain’s nominee for European Commissioner, avoiding sparking a by-election if he had chosen an MP.

In: Baroness Stowell

Last year the former No 10 aide to John Major steered the gay marriage Bill through the Lords, after which she was promoted to the role of communities and local government minister.

Attorney General

Out: Dominic Grieve

The Government’s most senior legal adviser since 2010 was demoted from the Cabinet; he has admitted he is “sad” to lose the role.

In: Jeremy Wright

Previously junior justice minister, Wright has kept a low profile: Sky’s Adam Boulton admitted today that he would struggle to pick Wright out in an identity parade.

Minister of State for Business, Enterprise and Energy

Out: Michael Fallon

In: Matthew Hancock (who will attend Cabinet, and be minister for Portsmouth)

Clearly forgiven for posing in front of “Sack Cameron” graffiti last week, he reportedly used to prep the Prime Minister before PMQs and is another of Osborne’s protégés to rise.

Minister of State for the Home Office and Ministry of Justice (police minister)

Out: Damian Green

Sacked last night, Green’s departure was described as “inexplicable” by political commentator Ian Dale, who noted him as a “good media performer and original thinker”.

In: Mike Penning

The former fireman has been promoted after being appointed disabilities minister last October.

Minister of State for Business and Education

Out: Matthew Hancock

In: Nick Boles (he will also have responsibility for equal marriage legislation)

Formerly Minister for Planning and Development, Boles will now preside over adult skills, apprenticeships and business support.

Minister of State for the Department of Work and Pensions (minister for disabled people)

Out: Mike Penning

In: Mark Harper

After resigning swiftly and honourably earlier this year when he discovered his cleaner was working in the UK illegally, Harper has been restored to a post in the Government.

Minister of State for the Cabinet Office

In: Jo Johnson

Previously heading up David Cameron’s policy unit and a junior Cabinet Office minister, Boris’s brother has been promoted to minister of state.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury

Out: Nicky Morgan

In: David Gauke

Previously the Exchequer Secretary, Gauke has been bumped up a notch in the Treasury.

Minister of State for Transport

In: John Hayes

Hayes will also carry on as a Cabinet Office minister, where his role was described as the Prime Minister’s envoy to the backbenches.

Lord Privy Seal

Out: Andrew Lansley

In: Oliver Letwin

A Cabinet Office minister for government policy, Letwin’s promotion today has been described as tokenistic.

Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury

Out: David Gauke

In: Priti Patel

The right-wing former PR executive joined the government and will now deal with tax policy.

Minister for Schools

Out: Liz Truss

In: Nick Gibb

Returning to his old post, Gibb will be “working with Nicky Morgan to ensure no let up in education reforms”, according to a tweet by Cameron.

Parliamentary Secretary

Out: Jo Johnson

In: Brooks Newmark (he will also be minister for civil society)

The Braintree MP has joined the Government. Formerly a whip between 2010 and 2012.

Minister for Communities

Out: Baroness Stowell

In: Brandon Lewis

Local government minister Lewis was promoted to Minister of State.

 

Other moves:

Ken Clarke, minister without portfolio, is out of the Cabinet entirely.

Nicky Morgan will hold her current position as minister for women alongside the education brief.

Also out are Nick Hurd, minister for civil society (replaced by Brooks Newmark); Alan Duncan, international development minister (replaced by Desmond Swayne, a former whip); Greg Barker, energy minister.

Lord Hill is nominated for European Commissioner.

Esther McVey, employment minister (number two in the Department of Work and Pensions) will stay there, but attend Cabinet meetings.

Anna Soubry moves up to minister of state at Defence.

Penny Mordaunt is a parliamentary under secretary at Communities and is responsible for coastal communities.

Amber Rudd becomes a parliamentary under secretary at the department of energy and climate change. 

Claire Perry becomes a parliamentary under secretary at transport with responsibility for rail.

Robert Buckland is the new solicitor-general.

Julian Brazier becomes a junior defence minister.

George Freeman becomes minister for life sciences.

Ed Vaizey becomes minister for digital industries.

Andrew Murrison moves from defence to join the Northern Ireland office as a junior minister.

Oliver Letwin remains as minister for government policy and becomes Lord Privy Seal.

Alun Cairns becomes parliamentary under secretary for the Wales office and will be Government Whip.

Sam Gymiah becomes parliamentary under secretary at the Department for Education.

Mel Stride, Therese Coffey, Ben Wallace and Damian Hinds become Assistant Government Whips.

Over at the Spectator, Fraser Nelson is reporting that Liam Fox was offered a minister of state role at the Foreign Office, but declined it. Fox has now confirmed this.

Picture: ANDRÉ CARRILHO
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Leader: Boris Johnson, a liar and a charlatan

The Foreign Secretary demeans a great office of state with his carelessness and posturing. 

Boris Johnson is a liar, a charlatan and a narcissist. In 1988, when he was a reporter at the Times, he fabricated a quotation from his godfather, an eminent historian, which duly appeared in a news story on the front page. He was sacked. (We might pause here to acknowledge the advantage to a young journalist of having a godfather whose opinions were deemed worthy of appearing in a national newspaper.) Three decades later, his character has not improved.

On 17 September, Mr Johnson wrote a lengthy, hyperbolic article for the Daily Telegraph laying out his “vision” for Brexit – in terms calculated to provoke and undermine the Prime Minister (who was scheduled to give a speech on Brexit in Florence, Italy, as we went to press). Extracts of his “article”, which reads more like a speech, appeared while a terror suspect was on the loose and the country’s threat level was at “critical”, leading the Scottish Conservative leader, Ruth Davidson, to remark: “On the day of a terror attack where Britons were maimed, just hours after the threat level is raised, our only thoughts should be on service.”

Three other facets of this story are noteworthy. First, the article was published alongside other pieces echoing and praising its conclusions, indicating that the Telegraph is now operating as a subsidiary of the Johnson for PM campaign. Second, Theresa May did not respond by immediately sacking her disloyal Foreign Secretary – a measure of how much the botched election campaign has weakened her authority. Finally, it is remarkable that Mr Johnson’s article repeated the most egregious – and most effective – lie of the EU referendum campaign. “Once we have settled our accounts, we will take back control of roughly £350m per week,” the Foreign Secretary claimed. “It would be a fine thing, as many of us have pointed out, if a lot of that money went on the NHS.”

This was the promise of Brexit laid out by the official Vote Leave team: we send £350m to Brussels, and after leaving the EU, that money can be spent on public services. Yet the £350m figure includes the rebate secured by Margaret Thatcher – so just under a third of the sum never leaves the country. Also, any plausible deal will involve paying significant amounts to the EU budget in return for continued participation in science and security agreements. To continue to invoke this figure is shameless. That is not a partisan sentiment: the head of the UK Statistics Authority, Sir David Norgrove, denounced Mr Johnson’s “clear misuse of official statistics”.

In the days that followed, the chief strategist of Vote Leave, Dominic Cummings – who, as Simon Heffer writes in this week's New Statesman, is widely suspected of involvement in Mr Johnson’s article – added his voice. Brexit was a “shambles” so far, he claimed, because of the ineptitude of the civil service and the government’s decision to invoke Article 50 before outlining its own detailed demands.

There is a fine Yiddish word to describe this – chutzpah. Mr Johnson, like all the other senior members of Vote Leave in parliament, voted to trigger Article 50 in March. If he and his allies had concerns about this process, the time to speak up was then.

It has been clear for some time that Mr Johnson has no ideological attachment to Brexit. (During the referendum campaign, he wrote articles arguing both the Leave and Remain case, before deciding which one to publish – in the Telegraph, naturally.) However, every day brings fresh evidence that he and his allies are not interested in the tough, detailed negotiations required for such an epic undertaking. They will brush aside any concerns about our readiness for such a huge challenge by insisting that Brexit would be a success if only they were in charge of it.

This is unlikely. Constant reports emerge of how lightly Mr Johnson treats his current role. At a summit aiming to tackle the grotesque humanitarian crisis in Yemen, he is said to have astounded diplomats by joking: “With friends like these, who needs Yemenis?” The Foreign Secretary demeans a great office of state with his carelessness and posturing. By extension, he demeans our politics. 

This article first appeared in the 21 September 2017 issue of the New Statesman, The revenge of the left