Chancellor George Osborne. Photo: Oli Scarff
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Merging income tax and NIC: the Chancellor's calculations

The proposed plan could increase pressure for tax cuts and undermine the contributory principle.

George Osborne is planning to merge income tax and national insurance, according to a report in today’s Times.

The move would increase transparency of the tax system and likely raise pressure for tax cuts, because rolling the two together would help workers to see the scale of how much they contribute to the state.

The total sum paid by workers on the basic rate of income tax, for example, would rise from 20 per cent to 32 per cent. The amount paid by those in the higher bracket would rise from 40 per cent to about 52 per cent, with 2 per cent added to earnings above £42,000.

National insurance is the exchequer’s second-largest income source, raking in £104.5bn in 2012-13. Income tax contributed £152bn.

The political calculations made by No 11 and No 10 (said to be actively considering the proposal) are interesting. The Tories are willing, assuming they make it back into government next year, to risk accusations that they have raised the overall tax rate.

Some allegations would be incorrect and based merely on perception. Incidentally, that risk hints at the work the government would have cut out for itself in creating a public-awareness campaign which explains the amalgamation.

Other accusations would be true, reflecting the closure of quirks and loopholes in the national insurance system if it were merged with income tax. The self-employed, for example, would pay more in the new system because generally speaking they pay less national insurance than employees.

So why would Osborne risk the fallout? The gamble is offset by the Conservatives’ hope that greater transparency of the scale of individuals’ contributions to the state will incline voters towards tax cuts, which are on the cards given that public finances look set improve in the next parliament.

Another hidden benefit is that rolling national insurance contributions and income tax together will undermine the contributory principle, making it easier to slash welfare.

Because national insurance is, of course, a social insurance scheme, which entitles people to specific social security benefits – known as “contributory benefits” – through a history of contributions to the scheme made by themselves and by their employers.

First proposed by David Lloyd George in the People’s Budget of 1908, it was introduced in 1912 to create a national system of insurance for working people against illness and unemployment.

While a portion of the national insurance fund is set aside for the NHS, the rest funds contributory benefits. So to do away with national insurance will further harm the contributory principle that is a key defence of welfare.

On the other hand, to give due weight to the downsides national insurance, it is true to say that its rates have become opaque and difficult to calculate. It is because of this opacity, and therefore the ability for govenments to raise it quietly, that the Chancellor is said to be suspicious of national insurance as a “stealth tax”.

But its contributory principle means that accusations from the TaxPayers’ Alliance, among others, that national insurance has become indistinguishable from income tax, with any division merely “academic”, is wrong.

Overall the plan looks likely to be popular with Conservative MPs and voters. The biggest obstacle, however, is likely to be practical rather than ideological: namely, the risks associated with the ambitious IT system that would be needed to implement the merge.

The prospect is a daunting one following the chain of problems, and attendant bad press, that have occurred in the technology developed for the Department for Work and Pensions’ flagship Universal Credit policy, which has suffered delays and multi-million pound write-offs.

According to the Times, it was only such fears of a Whitehall IT disaster that restrained the Chancellor from announcing the move in this year’s budget in April.

The public-awareness campaign needed to explain the merge would present another challenge, as public misunderstanding would lead to the perception that the government was simply hiking tax rates overall.

Other questions remain too. Will pensioners, for example, whose pension incomes are exempt from national insurance contributions, still enjoy the lower tax rate if they continue to work?

And the million-dollar question: how will the shortfall from employers’ contributions to national insurance be made up? It remains to be seen whether corporation tax would be raised, for example, or whether income tax on employees would have to cover it.

Lucy Fisher writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2013. She tweets @LOS_Fisher.

 

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Four times Owen Smith has made sexist comments

The Labour MP for Pontypridd and Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour leadership rival has been accused of misogynist remarks. Again.

2016

Wanting to “smash” Theresa May “back on her heels”

During a speech at a campaign event, Owen Smith blithely deployed some aggressive imagery about attacking the new Prime Minister. In doing so, he included the tired sexist trope beloved of the right wing press about Theresa May’s shoes – her “kitten heels” have long been a fascination of certain tabloids:

“I’ll be honest with you, it pained me that we didn’t have the strength and the power and the vitality to smash her back on her heels and argue that these our values, these are our people, this is our language that they are seeking to steal.”

When called out on his comments by Sky’s Sophy Ridge, Smith doubled down:

“They love a bit of rhetoric, don’t they? We need a bit more robust rhetoric in our politics, I’m very much in favour of that. You’ll be getting that from me, and I absolutely stand by those comments. It’s rhetoric, of course. I don’t literally want to smash Theresa May back, just to be clear. I’m not advocating violence in any way, shape or form.”

Your mole dug around to see whether this is a common phrase, but all it could find was “set back on one’s heels”, which simply means to be shocked by something. Nothing to do with “smashing”, and anyway, Smith, or somebody on his team, should be aware that invoking May’s “heels” is lazy sexism at best, and calling on your party to “smash” a woman (particularly when you’ve been in trouble for comments about violence against women before – see below) is more than casual misogyny.

Arguing that misogyny in Labour didn’t exist before Jeremy Corbyn

Smith recently told BBC News that the party’s nastier side only appeared nine months ago:

“I think Jeremy should take a little more responsibility for what’s going on in the Labour party. After all, we didn’t have this sort of abuse and intolerance, misogyny, antisemitism in the Labour party before Jeremy Corbyn became the leader.”

Luckily for Smith, he had never experienced misogyny in his party until the moment it became politically useful to him… Or perhaps, not being the prime target, he simply wasn’t paying enough attention before then?

2015

Telling Leanne Wood she was only invited on TV because of her “gender”

Before a general election TV debate for ITV Wales last year, Smith was caught on camera telling the Plaid Cymru leader that she only appeared on Question Time because she is a woman:

Wood: “Have you ever done Question Time, Owen?”

Smith: “Nope, they keep putting you on instead.”

Wood: “I think with party balance there’d be other people they’d be putting on instead of you, wouldn’t they, rather than me?”

Smith: “I think it helps. I think your gender helps as well.”

Wood: “Yeah.”

2010

Comparing the Lib Dems’ experience of coalition to domestic violence

In a tasteless analogy, Smith wrote this for WalesHome in the first year of the Tory/Lib Dem coalition:

“The Lib Dem dowry of a maybe-referendum on AV [the alternative vote system] will seem neither adequate reward nor sufficient defence when the Tories confess their taste for domestic violence on our schools, hospitals and welfare provision.

“Surely, the Liberals will file for divorce as soon as the bruises start to show through the make-up?”

But never fear! He did eventually issue a non-apology for his offensive comments, with the classic use of “if”:

“I apologise if anyone has been offended by the metaphorical reference in this article, which I will now be editing. The reference was in a phrase describing today's Tory and Liberal cuts to domestic spending on schools and welfare as metaphorical ‘domestic violence’.”

***

A one-off sexist gaffe is bad enough in a wannabe future Labour leader. But your mole sniffs a worrying pattern in this list that suggests Smith doesn’t have a huge amount of respect for women, when it comes to political rhetoric at least. And it won’t do him any electoral favours either – it makes his condemnation of Corbynite nastiness ring rather hollow.

I'm a mole, innit.