Nick Clegg, leaves his home in west London on May 23, 2014, a day following local council elections. Photograph: Getty Images.
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The worst night yet for the Lib Dems - but Clegg will survive

Clegg is unwilling to fall on his sword and the party isn't prepared to force him out.
 

In a competitive field, last night was the worst the Lib Dems have suffered since entering the coalition. The party lost all but one of its 11 MEPs and finished in fifth place behind the Greens. That Nick Clegg fought a spirited campaign, hailing the Lib Dems as the "party of in" and taking on Nigel Farage in debate, makes the result all the more painful. Those in the party who called in advance for his resignation will feel vindicated.

But my sense is that Clegg is likely to live to fight another day. Lib Dem grandees such as Paddy Ashdown and Ming Campbell, who could have told him that the game was up, have moved swiftly to shore up his position in media interviews this morning. The rebellion is still limited to just two MPs - John Pugh and Adrian Sanders - and just 283 members (0.66 per cent of the membership) have signed the petition calling for him to go.

With Clegg unwilling to fall on his sword, he would have to be forced out, and there are few Lib Dem MPs with an appetite for regicide at this stage of the electoral cycle. Vince Cable, the most plausible caretaker leader, has no intention of wielding the knife and other potential replacements, such as Tim Farron, are wisely biding their time until after the general election. Far better to begin the hard work of reconstruction after May 2015 than to take over a party heading for its worst election result in more than 20 years.

Then there is the fact that for all the Lib Dems' woes, they have an increasing chance of holding the balance of power in another hung parliament (with their vote holding up well in some Tory-facing areas). So long as Clegg is able to dangle that prize in front of his party, he will have the momentum he requires to stay in the job.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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How Jeremy Corbyn and an Arsenal player roasted Piers Morgan… in Spanish

Muy burn.

As if politics in the UK wasn’t spicy enough, watch what happens when you do it in Spanish.

It all started when backward ham Piers Morgan complained in a piece for the Mail that Jeremy Corbyn and his wife froze him out of a conversation with the Arsenal player Héctor Bellerín at the GQ Awards:

“Later, fellow Arsenal fan Jeremy Corbyn came over to speak to him. When I tried to interrupt, the Labour leader – whose wife is Mexican – promptly switched to fluent Spanish to shut me out of the conversation.

‘What did you tell him?’ I asked.

Corbyn smirked. ‘I told him to please send Arsène Wenger my very best and assure him he continues to have my full support, even if he’s lost yours, Piers. In fact, particularly because he’s lost yours…’

A keen-eyed tweeter picked up the passage about speaking Spanish, and the anecdote went viral:


So viral, in fact, that Bellerín himself commented on the story in a tweet saying, “Come on mate, don’t take it personally” to Morgan – punctuated masterfully with a crying laughing emoji.


Then the Labour leader himself joined in the great burning ceremony, replying to the thread in full Spanish:


His response translates as:

“It was nice to meet you. It’s better that we don’t tell him what we were talking about, he wouldn’t understand. Well-played in the game on Sunday.”

And muy buen juego to you too, El Jez.

I'm a mole, innit.