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Whose recovery is this? The top 1% are gaining most

As the highest earners have gained, the bottom 90 per cent have seen their share of income shrink.

Most people are familiar with the old adage about the "rich getting richer", but should we just accept that this will be at a much faster rate than for everyone else? The latest statistics on income, since economic growth finally returned, paint a disappointing picture of increasing inequality in Britain; they show that the richest one per cent have increased their share of income while the bottom 90 per cent on middle and lower incomes have seen their share shrink. While unemployment is falling, the continued squeeze on the pay of ordinary workers means that growth has mostly benefited the top.

Here’s how this story emerges from the Treasury’s own data: the latest "Income Tax Liabilities Bulletin" from HM Revenue and Customers, makes projections for the share of total income for percentile groups, setting out the changes affecting the least well-off and the richest in society. After three years of stagnation, growth has begun to gradually return throughout the past year 2013/14. But who has benefited from this growth in the past year?

It turns out the wealthiest one per cent are expected to see their share leap, even after tax has been taken into account, from 8.2 per cent of total UK income to 9.8 per cent of the total. This is a gain of a huge extra £15.4bn of income, shared among less than 300,000 of those at the top. Significantly, 90 per cent of the rest of the country – 27 million taxpayers - have seen their share of total income actually shrink from 71.3 per cent to 70.4 per cent.

What can we conclude from these new figures? First, it appears that we may be experiencing a recovery that is heavily skewed towards those already at the top of the pile – tilting the benefits of growth away from the many and handing them increasingly to the few.

Second, the tax cut for those lucky enough to earn over £150,000 per year in 2013/14 has been of great significance, especially for those receiving executive bonuses that had been held back until the 50p rate had gone.

Third, the shrinking share of income for 90 per cent of the rest of society should set alarm bells ringing; this isn’t just bearing down on the poorest, but a real squeeze on middle-income earners. When the overwhelming majority of the population now see the wealthiest one percent zooming off into the distance, people will rightly ask whether the government are doing enough to build a fair economy that works for working people.

Perhaps people expect David Cameron and George Osborne to fashion an economic recovery which serves the very wealthiest, but we all know this is unbalanced and unsustainable. If the benefits of economic growth are not felt fairly by the vast majority, then the cost of living crisis will persist and divisions will worsen.

George Osborne used to say "we’re all in this together" – but that claim has long since been abandoned. Creating a genuinely One Nation recovery should mean the richest one per cent contribute a fairer share of tax, with a return to the 50p rate for the next Parliament as we get the deficit down. And it should also mean taking action to help the vast majority of working people, with tax cuts targeted at those on lower and middle incomes as a priority and measures to ensure work pays, such as expanding free childcare for parents.

Surely we need the Treasury to step in to ensure the benefits of any growth we get are shared more fairly than this? When 90 per cent of the rest of the country are seeing their share decline then that is a sign something is going badly wrong.

Chris Leslie is the shadow chief secretary to the Treasury

Chris Leslie is chair of Labour’s backbench Treasury Committee and was shadow Chancellor in 2015. 

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Theresa May's cabinet regroups: 11 things we know about Brexit negotiations so far

The new PM wants a debate on social mobility and Brexit. 

This was the summer of the Phony Brexit. But on Wednesday, the new Tory cabinet emerged from their holiday hideaways to discuss how Britain will negotiate its exit from the EU. 

The new prime minister Theresa May is hosting a meeting that includes Brexiteers like David Davis, now minister for Brexit, Boris Johnson, the new Foreign secretary, and Liam Fox.

For now, their views on negotiations are taking place behind closed doors at the PM’s country retreat, Chequers. But here is what we know so far:

1. Talks won’t begin this year

May said in July that official negotiations would not start in 2016. Instead, she pledged to take the time to secure “a sensible and orderly departure”. 

2. But forget a second referendum

In her opening speech to cabinet, May said: “We must continue to be very clear that ‘Brexit means Brexit’, that we’re going to make a success of it. That means there’s no second referendum; no attempts to sort of stay in the EU by the back door; that we’re actually going to deliver on this.”

3. And Article 50 remains mysterious

A No.10 spokesman has confirmed that Parliament will “have its say” but did not clarify whether this would be before or after Article 50 is triggered. According to The Telegraph, May has been told she has the authority to invoke it without a vote in Parliament, although she has confirmed she will not do so this eyar.

4. The cabinet need to speak up

May’s “you break it, you fix it” approach to cabinet appointments means that key Brexiteers are now in charge of overseeing affected areas, such as farming and international relations. According to the BBC, the PM is asking each minister to report back on opportunities for their departments. 

5. Brexit comes with social mobility

As well as Brexit, May is discussing social reform with her cabinet. She told them: “We want to be a government and a country that works for everyone.” The PM already performed some social mobility of her own, when she ditched public school boy Chancellor George Osborne in favour of state school Philip Hammond. 

6. All eyes will be on DExEU

Davis, aka Brexit minister, heads up the Department for Exiting the EU, a new ministerial department. According to Oliver Ilott, from the Institute for Government, this department will be responsible for setting the ground rules across Whitehall. He  said: “DExEu needs to make sure that there is a shared understanding of the parameters of future negotiations before Whitehall departments go too far down their own rabbit holes.”

7. May wants to keep it friendly

The PM talked to Prime Minister Sipilä of Finland and Prime Minister Solberg of Norway on the morning of the cabinet meeting. She pledged Britain would "live up to our obligations" in the EU while it remained a member and "maintain a good relationship with the EU as well as individual European countries".

8. But everything's on the table

May also told the Finnish and Norwegian prime ministers that negotiators should consider what is going to work best for the UK and what is going to work for the European Union, rather than necessarily pursuing an existing model. This suggests she may not be aiming to join Norway in the European Economic Area. 

9. She gets on with Angela Merkel

While all 27 remaining EU countries will have a say in Brexit negotiations, Germany is Europe’s economic powerhouse. May’s first meeting appeared amiable, with the PM telling reporters: “We have two women here who have got on and had a very constructive discussion, two women who, I may say, get on with the job.” The German Chancellor responded: “Exactly. I completely agree with that.”

10. But less so with Francoise Hollande

The French president said Brexit negotiations should start “the sooner the better” and argued that freedom of labour could not be separated from other aspects of the single market. 

11. Britain wants to hold onto its EU banking passports

The “passporting system” which makes it easier for banks based in London to operate on the Continent, is now in jeopardy. We know the UK Government will be fighting to keep passports, because a paper on that very issue was accidentally shown to camera.