Ed Miliband shakes hands with supporters after a speech at Bloxwich Leisure Centre on May 19, 2014 in Walsall. Photograph: Getty Images
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Miliband to make 10 visits on final day of campaigning

Labour leader will travel across five regions to promote ten "cost-of-living" pledges.

After announcing more policy in the last few weeks than any other leader in recent memory (including a ban on exploitative zero-hours contracts, a cap on rent increases, a GP appointment guarantee and an increase in the minimum wage), Ed Miliband plans to spend the final day of campaigning making 10 visits around the country, each one highlighting one of Labour's 10 pledges from its "cost-of-living contract". His tour, across five regions, will start in London and end in his constituency of Doncaster North. 

He said: 

Tomorrow I will be going all round England - north and south, east and west - laying out Labour's ten pledges from our cost of living contract.

I will be urging people to vote Labour on Thursday because I know Britain can do better than this.

And it is Labour MEPs and Labour councillors who can help deliver.

We have shown in this campaign the difference we can make: on housing, on the NHS, on wages, on immigration, on all of the major issues the country faces.

If I have heard one message most of all in this campaign, it is the depths of discontent about the way the country is run.

The challenges go beyond this government. And people are asking whether any political party can turn it round?

Can anyone rebuild the link between a hard day's work and ordinary family finances?

That link that used to be the foundation of our country's prosperity.

That used to guarantee the people of this country a decent life for them and tier families.

My answer is that Labour can and Labour will.

People should vote Labour on Thursday to make Britain better than this.

Vote Labour to make your family better off.

It certainly sounds tiring, but then Miliband is the man who, as climate change secretary, went without sleep for more than 48 hours in order to secure a deal at the Copenhagen summit. 

The tour will, however, provide journalists with plenty of chances to trip him up over the cost of staple items and the names of Labour council leaders. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty Images.
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The Brexit slowdown is real

As Europe surges ahead, the UK is enduring its worst economic growth for five years. 

The recession that the Treasury and others forecast would follow the EU referendum never came. But there is now unmistakable evidence of an economic slowdown. 

Growth in the second quarter of this year was 0.3 per cent, which, following quarter one's 0.2 per cent, makes this the worst opening half since 2012. For individuals, growth is now almost non-existent. GDP per capita rose by just 0.1 per cent, continuing the worst living standards recovery on record. 

That Brexit helped cause the slowdown, rather than merely coincided with it, is evidenced by several facts. One is that, as George Osborne's former chief of staff Rupert Harrison observes, "the rest of Europe is booming and we're not". In the year since the EU referendum, Britain has gone from being one of the west's strongest performers to one of its weakest. 

The long-promised economic rebalancing, meanwhile, is further away than ever. Industrial production and manufacturing declined by 0.4 per cent and 0.5 per cent respectively, with only services (up 0.5 per cent) making up for the shortfall. But with real wage growth negative (falling by 0.7 per cent in the three months to May 2017), and household saving at a record low, there is limited potential for consumers to continue to power growth. The pound's sharp depreciation since the Brexit vote has cut wages (by increasing inflation) without producing a corresponding rise in exports. 

To the UK's existing defects – low productivity, low investment and low pay – new ones have been added: political uncertainty and economic instability. As the clock runs down on its departure date, Britain is drifting towards Brexit in ever-worse shape. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.