Sajid Javid speaks at the World Islamic Economic Forum at ExCel on October 30, 2013 in London. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Sajid Javid replaces Maria Miller as Culture Secretary

Osborne ally becomes the first 2010 Tory to enter the cabinet as Nicky Morgan is named women's minister. 

David Cameron took almost all of Westminster by surprise when he announced on Twitter that Sajid Javid, a key ally of George Osborne, would replace Maria Miller as culture secretary (becoming the first of the 2010 Tory intake to enter the cabinet). Most had bet on another woman taking her place, with Esther McVey, Nicky Morgan and Liz Truss among the frontrunners. 

But all become clear minutes later when Cameron announced that Nicky Morgan, currently the Economic Secretary to the Treasury, would take over from Javid as Financial Secretary and serve as minister for women, attending cabinet in that capacity. By promoting Morgan to the cabinet, Cameron has ensured that the number of women doesn't fall below the already lamentable level of five but Javid's ascension to Culture Secretary means there are now just three full members of the cabinet who are female (Theresa May, Justine Greening and Theresa Villiers) and not a single mother.

But in appointing Javid, the PM has wisely rewarded one of the brightest of the 2010 Tory intake (he became a vice president at Chase Manhattan at 25) and gone some way to addressing the Tories' ethnic minority problem. Javid, the son of a Pakistani bus driver, has previously urged Cameron to addresss the toxic legacy of Enoch Powell's "rivers of blood" speech, calling for the PM to say Powell "doesn’t represent what the Conservative Party is today in any way and to set out what the Conservative Party actually is when it comes to race relations, multiculturalism and so forth"

It's also worth noting that Javid has taken over the equalities brief from Miller. Morgan's opposition to equal marriage (she voted against it last year) was almost certainly a factor in the decision not to give her the job. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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