George Osborne during a visit to the Royal Mint on March 25, 2014 in Llantrisant, Wales. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Osborne's new tax cutting agenda could mean even bigger spending cuts

The Chancellor's new assumption that tax cuts significantly boost growth could result in a higher than expected deficit. 

For years, George Osborne has opposed what he describes as "unfunded tax cuts": those that are not paid for by a tax rise or a spending cut elsewhere. As recently as February 2013, he told the US-based Manhattan Institute:

I am more of a Thatcherite than a Reaganite when it comes to tax policy...I'm a fiscal conservative and I don't want to take risks with my public finances on an assumption that we are at some point in the Laffer curve. What I would say is let's see the proof in the pudding, in other words. I'm a low tax conservative, I want to reduce taxes but I basically think you have to do the hard work of reducing the cost of government to pay for those lower taxes.

It is a stance that has long dismayed his party's Lafferites. But in a break with his past position, Osborne has now embraced "dynamic scoring": a model favoured by the US right which purports to measure the full effect of tax cuts on the economy, rather than merely the "static" cost to the Treasury. The aim is to demonstrate that tax cuts are possible even in times of fiscal constraint (the deficit was forecast to be £108bn in 2013-14) due to the beneficial impact that they have on growth.

Osborne will today publish new Treasury research suggesting that the 20 per cent real-terms reduction in fuel duty since 2011 is likely to generate enough growth to cover around half of the lost revenue (having previously published a similar study on corporation tax). According to the paper, tax cuts of this level will boost output by up to 0.5 per cent of GDP (£7.5bn) over the next two decades by encouraging people to drive more and stimulating consumption and investment. During his recent appearance at the Treasury select committee, Osborne said: "I’m not expecting some overnight change in the way Parliament and the Treasury does public finances but I think it will start this quiet revolution where people come to realise that if you leave more money in people’s pockets they tend to be better at spending it and investing it than government."

But among those sceptical of Osborne's "quiet revolution" is the Office for Budget Responsibility, the fiscal watchdog he founded in 2010, which has steadfastly refused to embrace the model. This is because, as the FT's Chris Giles notes, the Treasury research relies on some generous assumptions. For instance, "that the cost of the fuel duty cuts not offset by other increased revenues is paid for by the imposition of a pure poll tax, paid equally by every household regardless of income."

As Giles notes, "Had the Treasury used more realistic offsetting tax increases, its results would show the fuel tax cuts raised growth by less and the offsetting revenue growth would have been smaller." In addition, the research ignores the negative economic effects of cutting fuel duty such as increased congestion and pollution on the grounds that they are too difficult to measure. 

It's for this reason that the oracle of economics, the Institute for Fiscal Studies, warns that "You have to wait 20 years before you get the full response if the model is correct. Clearly there are risks there and a lot of uncertainties". The danger is that Osborne, seeking to woo the Conservative right (whose support he will need in any future leadership contest), banks the anticipated revenue from the fuel duty tax cuts, leaving the government exposed if it fails to materialise. And should the deficit prove larger than expected, there is little doubt that the Chancellor will rely on spending cuts, rather than tax increases (which he has promised to avoid), to plug the gap. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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For a mayor who will help make Londoners healthier, vote for Tessa Jowell

The surgeon, former Labour health minister and chairman of the London Health Commission, Ara Darzi, backs Tessa Jowell to be Labour's candidate for London mayor.

London’s mayor matters. As the world’s preeminent city, London possesses an enormous wealth of assets: energetic and enterprising people, successful businesses, a strong public sector, good infrastructure and more parks and green spaces than any other capital city.

Yet these aren’t put to work to promote the health of Londoners. Indeed, quite the opposite: right now, London faces a public health emergency.

More than a million Londoners still smoke tobacco, with 67 children lighting up for the first time every day. London’s air quality is silently killing us. We have the dirtiest air in Europe, causing more than 4,000 premature deaths every year.

Nearly four million Londoners are obese or overweight – and just 13% of us walk or cycle to school or work, despite half of us living close enough to do so. All Londoners should be ashamed that we have the highest rate of childhood obesity of any major global city.

It’s often been said that we don’t value our health until we lose it. As a cancer surgeon, I am certain that is true. And I know that London can do better. 

For that reason, twice in the past decade, I’ve led movements of Londoners working together to improve health and to improve the NHS. Healthcare for London gave our prescription for a better NHS in the capital. And Better Health for London showed how Londoners could be helped to better health, as well as better healthcare.

In my time championing health in London, I’ve never met a politician more committed to doing the right thing for Londoners’ health than Tessa Jowell. That’s why I’m backing her as Labour’s choice for mayor. We need a mayor who will deliver real change, and Tessa will be that mayor.  

When she invited me to discuss Better Health for London, she had the courage to commit to doing what is right, no matter how hard the politics. Above all, she wanted to know how many lives would be saved or improved, and what she could do to help.

In Tessa, I see extraordinary passion, boundless energy and unwavering determination to help others.

For all Londoners, the healthiest choice isn’t always easy and isn’t always obvious. Every day, we make hundreds of choices that affect our health – how we get to and from school or work, what we choose to eat, how we spend our free time.

As mayor, Tessa Jowell will help Londoners by making each of those individual decisions that bit easier. And in that difference is everything: making small changes individually will make a huge difference collectively.  

Tessa is committed to helping London’s children in their early years – just as she did in government by delivering Sure Start. Tessa will tackle London’s childhood obesity epidemic by getting children moving just as she did with the Olympics. Tessa will make London a walking city – helping all of us to healthier lifestyles.

And yes, she’s got the guts to make our parks and public places smoke free, helping adults to choose to stop smoking and preventing children from starting.   

The real test of leadership is not to dream up great ideas or make grand speeches. It is to build coalitions to make change happen. It is to deliver real improvements to daily life. Only Tessa has the track record of delivery – from the Olympics to Sure Start.   

Like many in our capital, I am a Londoner by choice. I am here because I believe that London is the greatest city in the world – and is bursting with potential to be even greater.

The Labour party now has a crucial choice to make. London needs Labour to choose Tessa, to give Londoners the chance to choose better health.