David Cameron speaks at the World Economic Forum on Jan. 24, 2014. Photograph: Getty Images.
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New women's minister Nicky Morgan to "report directly" to Cameron

Minister's boss is still a man - just a different man.
 

One would have thought that even David Cameron could execute a minor cabinet reshuffle without controversy. But seemingly not. After naming Nicky Morgan as the new women's minister, but denying her the related equalities brief (owing to her opposition to equal marriage), the question arose of who was ultimately responsibility for the portfolio: Morgan or Sajid Javid (the new Culture Secretary and minister for equalities)?

At the post-PMQs briefing,  Cameron's spokesman said: "He is the cabinet minister. She attends cabinet", a response that suggested that, for the first time ever, the women's minister would be subordinate to a man. But at this afternoon's lobby briefing, the spokesman withdrew his earlier remarks ("a mistake") and announced that Morgan would instead "report directly to the Prime Minister on women's issues" (not Javid). He added: "She will have an office as Minister for Women supported by DCMS staff. But with regard to her responsibilities for women, she will report to the Prime Minister." In other words, Morgan's boss is still a man - just a different man.

Asked who had responsibility for issues relating to gay women, Cameron's spokesman simply replied that "ministers work as a team", a response that suggests that Morgan is still best described as "minister for straight women".  And, of course, there is now no full member of the cabinet responsible for women. Even by the standards of this government, quite a mess.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.