The image tweeted by Conservative chairman Grant Shapps last night.
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The Tories' bingo poster spoils Osborne's morning

The Chancellor is forced to comment on the patronising image in every broadcast interview.

For George Osborne, yesterday's Budget was a shambles-free occasion, with most of the changes he announced welcomed by the media and Labour unable to attack any specific measure (focusing instead on the continuing decline in living standards). But the Chancellor's morning has been marred by a remarkably inept poster tweeted by Conservative chairman Grant Shapps last night. 

In reference to the cuts in bingo tax and beer duty announced in the Budget, it declares that the Tories are helping "hardworking people do more of the things they enjoy" - an astonishingly patronising line that treats "working people" ("they") as a foreign breed. Robert Halfon, the MP for Harlow, who led the campaign for a cut in bingo duty, must have had his head in his hands. (The familiar claim that the party is for "hardworking people" reminds me of Margaret Thatcher on power: "Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't.")

Even Danny Alexander, whom Lib Dems accuse of going "native" at the Treasury, was moved to rare criticism, telling Newsnight: “I thought it was a spoof at first, it’s just pretty extraordinary. It may be our Budget but it’s their words, I think it’s rather patronising." 

As a result, Osborne has been asked to comment on the poster in every broadcast interview he's done this morning in just the kind of distraction from the "core message" that politcians loathe. He attempted to dismiss the row as "a campaign whipped up by Labour" but that conveniently ignores that it was conservative journalists, including Michael Gove's wife Sarah Vine (who tweeted "Please tell me this is not real"), who led the charge

While the furore hardly complains with the aftermath of the 2012 Budget, when Osborne was universally derided for raising taxes on pasties, pensioners, churches and charities, while cutting them for the top 1 per cent, it's still a mess he could have done without. Little wonder that the Tories are now desperately claiming that the poster was merely a "one-off tweet by the party chairman". 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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