Ed Miliband speaks at the Scottish Labour conference in Perth last week. Photograph: Getty Images.
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PMQs review: Miliband's price freeze saves him - but he needs a new hit

To settle his party's nerves, the Labour leader needs another trump card.

After his worst week as Labour leader since last summer, Ed Miliband returned to a scene of past glories at today's PMQs: his energy price freeze. SSE's announcement this morning that bills will be frozen until 2016 give him the peg he needed. "Would we be right to assume that the PM believes that this price freeze is unworkable, impossible to implement and probably a communist plot?" was his pitch-perfect opener. Cameron replied that it was only because of the government's reduction in green levies that the company had been able to act (as SSE said in its statement). Labour can reasonably argue that the coalition would never have taken this action had it not been for Miliband's campaign, but unlike when the policy was first announced, he can at least point to government support for billpayers.

Yet despite the best week for the Tories for months, Cameron appeared oddly rattled by Miliband's line of attack. As he knows, while the government's cuts to green levies have reduced most bills by around £50, they are still rising. So long as this remains the case, Labour's price freeze will retain its potency. His attempt, midway through the session, to change the subject to the Budget and the economy showed that he is still much happier fighting on this territory than on living standards (with Miliband, in Reagan mode, warning that people will be worse off in 2015 than they were in 2010).

"I'll tell him what's weak: weak is not having an economic policy, weak is not responding to the Budget," he raged. In response, Miliband quipped, "Not for the first time, calm down, dear, calm down", before seguing into a terrible bingo joke: "Or should I say for the benefit of the Chancellor, eyes down, dear?" It was a line that Cameron trumped with a genuine zinger later when he declared that bingo was "the only time he gets near Number 10".

But while Miliband's energy price freeze shielded him today, it served as a reminder that he hasn't enjoyed a similar hit since. If he is to settle Labour nerves, he'll soon need to unveil his "radical offer" on tuition fees and much else.

The other notable moment in the session came when Cameron confirmed that the government had been unable to reach agreement on amending the Hunting Act to allow more than two dogs to be used to flush out a fox (owing to Lib Dem opposition). But while Tory backbenchers will be dismayed, an interminable row over foxhunting is one "barnacle" (to borrow Lynton Crosby's phrase) that the PM can do without. Far better to keep banging on about the Budget.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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