Gove's "hero" Andrew Adonis attacks decision not to reappoint Ofsted head

The founder of the academies programme says Labour peer Sally Morgan "should be reappointed as chair of Ofsted, to preserve its independence and integrity."

In a speech in October 2012 to the think-tank Politeia, Michael Gove named two "heroes". The first was Teddy Roosevelt (more recently claimed as an inspiration by Ed Miliband), the second was Andrew Adonis. Gove hailed Tony Blair's former schools minister and the architect of the academies programme as "a man who has always been on the side of the future". He added:

"He created, protected, drove and grew the Academies programme. He did so in (and occasionally despite) a Labour government. He built alliances across parties – most notably in building on reforms introduced by another great moderniser – Kenneth Baker. And he has never stopped challenging all of us in Government to get on with it. 

"Because Andrew understands that one of the greatest enemies of innovation and progress is time."

For this reason, as well as his ministerial experience, it is notable that Adonis has joined those attacking Gove's decision not to reappoint Labour peer Sally Morgan as the chair of Ofsted. 

He tweeted today:

Adonis, who is now shadow infrastructure minister and is leading a growth review for Labour, also declared today that Gove's description of the state system is a "caricature". 

Gove has long sought to present his reforms as a continuation of those pursued by New Labour, an approach that has made it harder for the opposition to successfully challenge him. He said at his speech this morning that academies were "based on the work of [Kenneth] Baker, implemented by Blair and Adonis, and expanded by Cameron and Clegg". 

But Gove's careless partisanship means he is now in danger of losing any claim he has to Labour's mantle. 

Former Labour schools minister and the founder of the academies programme Andrew Adonis. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.